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Taking Punishment into Your Own Hands: An Experiment

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  • Peter Duersch

    (University of Heidelberg)

  • Julia Müller

    (Erasmus University Rotterdam)

Abstract

In a punishment experiment, we separate the demand for punishment in general from the demand to conduct punishment personally. Subjects experience an unfair split of their earnings from a real effort task and have to decide on the punishment of the person who determines the distribution. First, it is established whether the allocator's payoff is reduced and, afterwards, subjects take part in a second price auction for the right to (physically) carry out the act of payoff reduction themselves. Subjects bid positive amounts and are happier if they get to punish personally.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter Duersch & Julia Müller, 2013. "Taking Punishment into Your Own Hands: An Experiment," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 13-071/I, Tinbergen Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:tin:wpaper:20130071
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Peter Duersch & Julia Müller, 2017. "Bidding for nothing? The pitfalls of overly neutral framing," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(13), pages 932-935, July.
    2. Dickinson, David L. & Masclet, David, 2015. "Emotion venting and punishment in public good experiments," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 122(C), pages 55-67.
    3. Laura K. Gee & Xinxin Lyu & Heather Urry, 2017. "Anger Management: Aggression and Punishment in the Provision of Public Goods," Games, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(1), pages 1-28, January.
    4. Gago, Andrés, 2021. "Reciprocity and uncertainty: When do people forgive?," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 84(C).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    personal punishment; real effort task; experiment; auction;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C92 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Group Behavior
    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles

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