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A new perspective on the Gold Standard: Inflation as a population phenomenon

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Listed:
  • Joao Ricardo Faria

    (University of Texas at El Paso)

  • Peter McAdam

    (University of Surrey)

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to contribute a new model of the Gold Standard, focusing on the interaction between resource scarcity and demographics. In a dynamic micro-founded model we find that: i) prices and equilibrium gold holdings increase with population (a scale effect), but decrease with the population growth rate; ii) that the Gold Standard implies deflation unless extraction resources outstrip population growth; iii) there is no optimal quantity of money. The predictions of the model are examined using a structural VAR. Our results also shed light on debates about the viability of a return to the Gold Standard, and, more generally, on the interaction between policy variables and scarce resources.

Suggested Citation

  • Joao Ricardo Faria & Peter McAdam, 2012. "A new perspective on the Gold Standard: Inflation as a population phenomenon," School of Economics Discussion Papers 0412, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
  • Handle: RePEc:sur:surrec:0412
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    8. Barsky, Robert B & Summers, Lawrence H, 1988. "Gibson's Paradox and the Gold Standard," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 96(3), pages 528-550, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hoang, Thi Hong Van & Lahiani, Amine & Heller, David, 2016. "Is gold a hedge against inflation? New evidence from a nonlinear ARDL approach," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 54-66.
    2. repec:eee:jimfin:v:74:y:2017:i:c:p:53-68 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gold Standard; Cagan-Keynes; Labor; Extraction; Scarcity; Inflation; Deflation; Population Dynamics;

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E41 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Demand for Money

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