IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

How Placing Limitations on the Size of Personal Networks Changes the Structural Properties of Complex Networks

  • Somayeh Koohborfardhaghighi

    ()

    (College of Engineering, Seoul National University)

  • Jorn Altmann

    ()

    (College of Engineering, Seoul National University)

People-to-people interactions in the real world and in virtual environments (e.g., Facebook) can be represented through complex networks. Changes of the structural properties of these complex networks are caused through a variety of dynamic processes. While accepting the fact that variability in individual patterns of behavior (i.e., establishment of random or FOAF-type potential links) in social environments might lead to an increase or decrease in the structural properties of a complex network, in this paper, we focus on another factor that may contribute to such changes, namely the size of personal networks. Any personal network comes with the cost of maintaining individual connections. Despite the fact that technology has shrunk our world, there is also a limit to how many close friends one can keep and count on. It is a relatively small number. In this paper, we develop a multi-agent based model to capture, compare, and explain the structural changes within a growing social network (e.g., expanding the social relations beyond one's social circles). We aim to show that, in addition to various dynamic processes of human interactions, limitations on the size of personal networks can also lead to changes in the structural properties of networks (i.e., the average shortest-path length). Our simulation result shows that the famous small world theory of interconnectivity holds true or even can be shrunk, if people manage to utilize all their existing connections to reach other parties. In addition to this, it can clearly be observed that the network¡¯s average path length has a significantly smaller value, if the size of personal networks is set to larger values in our network growth model. Therefore, limitations on the size of personal networks in network growth models lead to an increase in the network¡¯s average path length.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: ftp://147.46.237.98/DP-110.pdf
File Function: First version, 2014
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Seoul National University; Technology Management, Economics, and Policy Program (TEMEP) in its series TEMEP Discussion Papers with number 2014110.

as
in new window

Length: 17 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2014
Date of revision: Jan 2014
Publication status: Published in Proceedings of the 6th International Workshop on Web Intelligence & Communities (WI&C 2014).
Handle: RePEc:snv:dp2009:2014110
Contact details of provider: Postal: 599 Gwanak-Ro, Gwanak-Gu, Seoul 151-744
Phone: +82-2-880-8386
Fax: +82-2-873-7229
Web page: http://temep.snu.ac.kr/
Email:


More information through EDIRC

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:snv:dp2009:2014110. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Jorn Altmann)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.