IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

A Sequential Malmquist-Luenberger Productivity Index


  • Donghyun Oh
  • Almas Heshmati

    () (Technology Management, Economics and Policy Program(TEMEP), Seoul National University)


This study proposes an alternative methodology for measuring environmentally sensitive productivity growth. The rationale of this methodology is to consider the features of technology appropriately by excluding a spurious technical regress based on the macroeconomic perspective. In order to consider this condition and to develop an alternative index, a directional distance function and the concept of the successive sequential production possibility set are combined. With this combination, the conventional Malmquist-Luenberger productivity index is modified to give the alternative sequential environmentally sensitive productivity index. This proposed index is employed in measuring productivity growth and its decomposed components of OECD countries for the period 1970-2003. We distinguish two main empirical findings. First, even though the components of the conventional Malmquist-Luenberger productivity index and the proposed index are different, the developments of productivity are similar. Second, unlike in previous studies, the efficiency change is the main contributor to the earlier study period, whereas the effect of technical change has prevailed over time.

Suggested Citation

  • Donghyun Oh & Almas Heshmati, 2009. "A Sequential Malmquist-Luenberger Productivity Index," TEMEP Discussion Papers 200910, Seoul National University; Technology Management, Economics, and Policy Program (TEMEP), revised Aug 2009.
  • Handle: RePEc:snv:dp2009:200910

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    File Function: First version, 2009
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Yoruk, BarIs K. & Zaim, Osman, 2005. "Productivity growth in OECD countries: A comparison with Malmquist indices," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 401-420, June.
    2. William L. Weber & Bruce Domazlicky, 2001. "Productivity Growth and Pollution in State Manufacturing," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 83(1), pages 195-199, February.
    3. Fare, Rolf & Grosskopf, Shawna & Weber, William L., 2006. "Shadow prices and pollution costs in U.S. agriculture," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(1), pages 89-103, January.
    4. Yujiro Hayami, 1969. "Sources of Agricultural Productivity Gap Among Selected Countries," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 51(3), pages 564-575.
    5. Rolf Färe & Shawna Grosskopf & Carl A Pasurka, Jr., 2001. "Accounting for Air Pollution Emissions in Measures of State Manufacturing Productivity Growth," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(3), pages 381-409.
    6. Pasurka, Carl Jr., 2006. "Decomposing electric power plant emissions within a joint production framework," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 26-43, January.
    7. Tulkens, Henry & Vanden Eeckaut, Philippe, 1995. "Non-parametric efficiency, progress and regress measures for panel data: Methodological aspects," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 80(3), pages 474-499, February.
    8. Luenberger, David G., 1992. "Benefit functions and duality," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(5), pages 461-481.
    9. Kumar, Surender, 2006. "Environmentally sensitive productivity growth: A global analysis using Malmquist-Luenberger index," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(2), pages 280-293, February.
    10. Victoria Shestalova, 2003. "Sequential Malmquist Indices of Productivity Growth: An Application to OECD Industrial Activities," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 19(2), pages 211-226, April.
    11. Fare, Rolf & Grosskopf, Shawna & Noh, Dong-Woon & Weber, William, 2005. "Characteristics of a polluting technology: theory and practice," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 126(2), pages 469-492, June.
    12. Nakano, Makiko & Managi, Shunsuke, 2008. "Regulatory reforms and productivity: An empirical analysis of the Japanese electricity industry," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 201-209, January.
    13. Färe, Rolf & Grosskopf, Shawna & Pasurka, Carl A., 2007. "Environmental production functions and environmental directional distance functions," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 32(7), pages 1055-1066.
    14. Ramanathan, Ramakrishnan, 2005. "An analysis of energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions in countries of the Middle East and North Africa," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 30(15), pages 2831-2842.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Kabata, Tshepelayi, 2011. "The US Agriculture Greenhouse Emissions and Environmental Performance," 2011 Annual Meeting, July 24-26, 2011, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 103427, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

    More about this item


    efficiency change; environmentally sensitive productivity growth index; directional distance function; Malmquist-Luenberger productivity index; productivity; sequential production possibility set; technical change;

    JEL classification:

    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • D61 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Allocative Efficiency; Cost-Benefit Analysis
    • D57 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Input-Output Tables and Analysis
    • C43 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Index Numbers and Aggregation
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:snv:dp2009:200910. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Jorn Altmann). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.