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The Spatial Incidence of a Carbon Tax in Ireland

Author

Listed:
  • Eimear Leahy
  • Sean Lyons
  • Edgar L.W. Morgenroth
  • Richard S.J. Tol

    () (Economic and Social Research Institute)

Abstract

We estimate carbon dioxide emissions for the 3401 electoral districts of the Republic of Ireland combining data from the Census, the Household Budget Survey, the National Accounts, Environmental Accounts, and the Labour Accounts. The source data is available for many countries, but we are not aware of other studies that combine these data to estimate the spatial incidence of environmental regulation. For consumption, currently regulated emissions are reasonably uniform over space, while currently unregulated emissions vary much more substantially and are spatially concentrated in the commuter belts. This suggests that new regulation may run into local opposition. The incidence of a carbon tax correlates negatively with votes for the Green Party in the 2007 general election. Emissions from production are clustered around the cities but the spatial pattern is dominated by a small number of point sources (which are already regulated). Consumption emissions dominate total emissions in suburbs and the countryside. Production emissions dominate total emissions in the towns and cities as well as in those electoral districts that have a point source of carbon dioxide.

Suggested Citation

  • Eimear Leahy & Sean Lyons & Edgar L.W. Morgenroth & Richard S.J. Tol, "undated". "The Spatial Incidence of a Carbon Tax in Ireland," Working Papers FNU-174, Research unit Sustainability and Global Change, Hamburg University.
  • Handle: RePEc:sgc:wpaper:174
    as

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    File URL: http://www.fnu.zmaw.de/fileadmin/fnu-files/publication/working-papers/spatincwp.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2009
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Brannlund, Runar & Nordstrom, Jonas, 2004. "Carbon tax simulations using a household demand model," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 211-233, February.
    2. Kevin A. Hassett & Aparna Mathur & Gilbert E. Metcalf, 2009. "The Incidence of a U.S. Carbon Tax: A Lifetime and Regional Analysis," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2), pages 155-178.
    3. John P. Weyant, Francisco C. de la Chesnaye, and Geoff J. Blanford, 2006. "Overview of EMF-21: Multigas Mitigation and Climate Policy," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Special I), pages 1-32.
    4. Morgenstern, Richard D. & Ho, Mun & Shih, J.-S.Jhih-Shyang & Zhang, Xuehua, 2004. "The near-term impacts of carbon mitigation policies on manufacturing industries," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(16), pages 1825-1841, November.
    5. Callan, Tim & Lyons, Sean & Scott, Susan & Tol, Richard S.J. & Verde, Stefano, 2009. "The distributional implications of a carbon tax in Ireland," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 407-412, February.
    6. Nicholas Bull & Kevin A. Hassett & Gilbert E. Metcalf, 1994. "Who Pays Broad-Based Energy Taxes? Computing Lifetime and Regional Incidence," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 3), pages 145-164.
    7. Tol, Richard S. J. & Commins, Nicola & Crilly, Niamh & Lyons, Sean & Morgenroth, Edgar, 2009. "Towards Regional Environmental Accounts for Ireland," Papers WP293, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    8. James M. Poterba, 1993. "Global Warming Policy: A Public Finance Perspective," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 7(4), pages 47-63, Fall.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Spatial incidence of a carbon tax
      by Richard Tol in The Irish Economy on 2010-02-22 16:30:42

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Carbon tax; spatial data; voter behaviour;

    JEL classification:

    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • H22 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Incidence
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

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