IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/rza/wpaper/204.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Electricity Intensities of the OECD and South Africa: A Comparison

Author

Listed:
  • R. Inglesi-Lotz
  • J. Blignaut

Abstract

Improving a country’s electricity efficiency is considered one of the important ways to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions and to meet its commitments concerning climate change mitigation. In this paper, we conduct a comparative analysis between South Africa and OECD members’ total and sectoral electricity intensities. This is done to establish a sense of South Africa’s relative performance in this regard, to ascertain the possible scope for improvement and, if such scope exists, to determine in which of the industrial sectors

Suggested Citation

  • R. Inglesi-Lotz & J. Blignaut, 2011. "Electricity Intensities of the OECD and South Africa: A Comparison," Working Papers 204, Economic Research Southern Africa.
  • Handle: RePEc:rza:wpaper:204
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.econrsa.org/node/227
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Choi, Ki-Hong & Ang, B. W., 2003. "Decomposition of aggregate energy intensity changes in two measures: ratio and difference," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(6), pages 615-624, November.
    2. Weber, Christopher L., 2009. "Measuring structural change and energy use: Decomposition of the US economy from 1997 to 2002," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 1561-1570, April.
    3. Mukherjee, Kankana, 2008. "Energy use efficiency in U.S. manufacturing: A nonparametric analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 76-96, January.
    4. Freeman, Scott L. & Niefer, Mark J. & Roop, Joseph M., 1997. "Measuring industrial energy intensity: practical issues and problems," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(7-9), pages 703-714.
    5. Streimikiene, Dalia & Ciegis, Remigijus & Grundey, Dainora, 2008. "Promotion of energy efficiency in Lithuania," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 772-789, April.
    6. Streimikiene, Dalia & Ciegis, Remigijus & Grundey, Dainora, 2007. "Energy indicators for sustainable development in Baltic States," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 11(5), pages 877-893, June.
    7. Tiwari, Piyush, 2000. "An analysis of sectoral energy intensity in India," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(11), pages 771-778, September.
    8. Zhao, Xiaoli & Ma, Chunbo & Hong, Dongyue, 2010. "Why did China's energy intensity increase during 1998-2006: Decomposition and policy analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 1379-1388, March.
    9. Schipper, Lee & Ting, Michael & Khrushch, Marta & Golove, William, 1997. "The evolution of carbon dioxide emissions from energy use in industrialized countries: an end-use analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(7-9), pages 651-672.
    10. Liddle, Brantley, 2009. "Electricity intensity convergence in IEA/OECD countries: Aggregate and sectoral analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 1470-1478, April.
    11. Bosseboeuf, Didier & Chateau, Bertrand & Lapillonne, Bruno, 1997. "Cross-country comparison on energy efficiency indicators: the on-going European effort towards a common methodology," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(7-9), pages 673-682.
    12. Dean Baker, 2003. "The Environmental Kuznets Curve: Comments," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 17(1), pages 226-227, Winter.
    13. Mendiluce, María & Pérez-Arriaga, Ignacio & Ocaña, Carlos, 2010. "Comparison of the evolution of energy intensity in Spain and in the EU15. Why is Spain different?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 639-645, January.
    14. Jan van Heerden & Reyer Gerlagh & James Blignaut & Mark Horridge & Sebastiaan Hess & Ramos Mabugu & Margaret Mabugu, 2006. "Searching for Triple Dividends in South Africa: Fighting CO2 Pollution and Poverty while Promoting Growth," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2), pages 113-142.
    15. Kenneth B. Medlock III & Ronald Soligo, 2001. "Economic Development and End-Use Energy Demand," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2), pages 77-105.
    16. Bor, Yunchang Jeffrey, 2008. "Consistent multi-level energy efficiency indicators and their policy implications," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 2401-2419, September.
    17. Markandya, Anil & Pedroso-Galinato, Suzette & Streimikiene, Dalia, 2006. "Energy intensity in transition economies: Is there convergence towards the EU average?," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 121-145, January.
    18. Sebitosi, A.B., 2008. "Energy efficiency, security of supply and the environment in South Africa: Moving beyond the strategy documents," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 33(11), pages 1591-1596.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Bohlmann, Jessika & Bohlmann, Heinrich & Inglesi-Lotz, Roula & van Heerden, Jan, 2016. "An economy-wide evaluation of new power generation in South Africa: The case of Medupi and Kusile," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 450-460.
    2. Tafadzwa Ruzive & Thando Mkhombo & Simba Mhaka & Nomahlubi Mavikela & Andrew Phiri, 2017. "Elecricity intensity and unemployment in South Africa: A quantile regression analysis," Working Papers 1711, Department of Economics, Nelson Mandela University, revised Sep 2017.
    3. Kohler, Marcel, 2014. "Differential electricity pricing and energy efficiency in South Africa," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 524-532.
    4. repec:eee:appene:v:211:y:2018:i:c:p:743-754 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:eco:journ2:2017-04-29 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Roula Inglesi-Lotz, 2013. "The Impact of Renewable Energy Consumption to Economic Welfare: A Panel Data Application," Working Papers 201315, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    7. Nakumuryango, Amandine & Inglesi-Lotz, Roula, 2016. "South Africa’s performance on renewable energy and its relative position against the OECD countries and the rest of Africa," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 999-1007.
    8. Jessica A. Bohlmann & Heinrich R. Bohlmann & Roula Inglesi-Lotz, 2015. "An Economy-Wide Evaluation of New Power Generation in South Africa: The Case of Kusile and Medupi," Working Papers 201540, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    9. repec:eee:enepol:v:111:y:2017:i:c:p:298-311 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Nawaz, Saima & Iqbal, Nasir & Anwar, Saba, 2014. "Modelling electricity demand using the STAR (Smooth Transition Auto-Regressive) model in Pakistan," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 535-542.

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:rza:wpaper:204. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Charles Tanton). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/ersacza.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.