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Electricity intensity convergence in IEA/OECD countries: Aggregate and sectoral analysis

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  • Liddle, Brantley

Abstract

Convergence in electricity intensity is analyzed among a sample of IEA countries. Sigma-convergence (the narrowing of the distribution) and to a lesser degree gamma-convergence (movement within the distribution) are detected. However, electricity intensity convergence is less dramatic than energy intensity convergence. Convergence within the end-use sectors is more diverse: in terms of the rates, timing, extent, and ultimate modal structure of the distributions. Commercial electricity intensity has more recently converged toward a bell-shape distribution. By contrast, industry electricity intensity is largely converging toward two distinct groups of countries: one with relatively high electricity intensity and another one with relatively low electricity intensity. Different still is related residential electricity consumption per capita where a small group of countries has stopped growing; another group has slowed considerably, while a third group experienced rapid growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Liddle, Brantley, 2009. "Electricity intensity convergence in IEA/OECD countries: Aggregate and sectoral analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 1470-1478, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:37:y:2009:i:4:p:1470-1478
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