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Product Diversity, Strategic Interactions and Optimal Taxation

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  • V. LEWIS

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Abstract

The entry of a new product increases consumer surplus through additional product di- versity but decreases firm profits. In markets where .rm entry intensi.es competition and reduces markups through strategic interactions, we expect entry to be excessively high. In a simple general equilibrium model, this is true for industries with very similar goods. If goods are instead highly differentiated, entry is below optimum. In both cases, the optimal policy is a labour subsidy and a tax on entry. If labour subsidies are unavailable, subsidising entry is optimal for industries with low degrees of product differentiation.

Suggested Citation

  • V. Lewis, 2010. "Product Diversity, Strategic Interactions and Optimal Taxation," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 10/661, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
  • Handle: RePEc:rug:rugwps:10/661
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    File URL: http://wps-feb.ugent.be/Papers/wp_10_661.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Fabio Ghironi & Sanjay K. Chugh, 2010. "Optimal Fiscal Policy with Endogenous Product Variety," 2010 Meeting Papers 812, Society for Economic Dynamics.
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    3. Christian Broda & David E. Weinstein, 2006. "Globalization and the Gains From Variety," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 121(2), pages 541-585.
    4. Barseghyan, Levon & DiCecio, Riccardo, 2011. "Entry costs, industry structure, and cross-country income and TFP differences," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 146(5), pages 1828-1851, September.
    5. Federico Etro & Andrea Colciago, 2010. "Endogenous Market Structures and the Business Cycle," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 120(549), pages 1201-1233, December.
    6. Bergin, Paul R. & Corsetti, Giancarlo, 2008. "The extensive margin and monetary policy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(7), pages 1222-1237, October.
    7. Jeffrey R. Campbell & Hugo A. Hopenhayn, 2005. "Market Size Matters," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(1), pages 1-25, March.
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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Lewis, Vivien, 2013. "Optimal Monetary Policy And Firm Entry," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 17(08), pages 1687-1710, December.
    2. Vivien Lewis & Roland Winkler, 2015. "Product Diversity, Demand Structures, And Optimal Taxation," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 53(2), pages 979-1003, April.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    product diversity; entry; strategic interactions; optimal taxation;

    JEL classification:

    • E22 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Investment; Capital; Intangible Capital; Capacity
    • E61 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Policy Objectives; Policy Designs and Consistency; Policy Coordination
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy

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