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Product Diversity, Strategic Interactions and Optimal Taxation

  • V. LEWIS


The entry of a new product increases consumer surplus through additional product di- versity but decreases firm profits. In markets where .rm entry competition and reduces markups through strategic interactions, we expect entry to be excessively high. In a simple general equilibrium model, this is true for industries with very similar goods. If goods are instead highly differentiated, entry is below optimum. In both cases, the optimal policy is a labour subsidy and a tax on entry. If labour subsidies are unavailable, subsidising entry is optimal for industries with low degrees of product differentiation.

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Paper provided by Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration in its series Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium with number 10/661.

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Length: 10 pages
Date of creation: Jul 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:rug:rugwps:10/661
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  1. Christopoulou, Rebekka & Vermeulen, Philip, 2008. "Markups in the euro area and the US over the period 1981-2004: a comparison of 50 sectors," Working Paper Series 0856, European Central Bank.
  2. Federico Etro & Andrea Colciago, 2007. "Endogenous Market Structure and the Business Cycle," Working Papers 126, University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics, revised Nov 2007.
  3. Christian Broda & David Weinstein, 2004. "Globalization and the gains from variety," Staff Reports 180, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  4. Jeffrey Campbell, 2000. "Market Size Matters," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 1225, Econometric Society.
  5. Chugh, Sanjay K. & Ghironi, Fabio, 2015. "Optimal Fiscal Policy with Endogenous Product Variety," CEPR Discussion Papers 10674, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  6. Christian Broda & David E. Weinstein, 2010. "Product Creation and Destruction: Evidence and Price Implications," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(3), pages 691-723, June.
  7. Marc Melitz & Ghironi, Fabio & Florin Bilbiie, 2006. "Monopoly Power and Endogenous Variety in Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium: Distortions and Remedies," Working Paper 14401, Harvard University OpenScholar.
  8. Bergin, Paul R. & Corsetti, Giancarlo, 2008. "The extensive margin and monetary policy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(7), pages 1222-1237, October.
  9. Barseghyan, Levon & DiCecio, Riccardo, 2011. "Entry costs, industry structure, and cross-country income and TFP differences," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 146(5), pages 1828-1851, September.
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