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IR Reform: Choice and Compulsion

Author

Listed:
  • Mark Bahnisch

    (Griffith University, Queensland)

  • John Quiggin

    () (Department of Economics, University of Queensland)

Abstract

The paper begins with a schematic survey of the historical background, which provides the context for the changes embodied in WorkChoices, briefly described in Section 2. The core of the paper, Section 3, examines the role of choice and constraint in the design of the reforms. This analysis is used to inform an assessment of the likely implications of reform for wages and conditions, and likely effects on inequality. A similar analysis is applied to assess effects on growth, productivity, employment and unemployment. Finally, we consider possible future directions for alternative reform strategies
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Mark Bahnisch & John Quiggin, 2006. "IR Reform: Choice and Compulsion," Australian Public Policy Program Working Papers WP2P06, Risk and Sustainable Management Group, University of Queensland.
  • Handle: RePEc:rsm:pubpol:p06_2
    as

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    File URL: http://www.uq.edu.au/rsmg/WP/WPP06_2.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. John Addison & Paulino Teixeira, 2005. "What Have We Learned about the Employment Effects of Severance Pay? Further Iterations of Lazear Et al," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 32(3), pages 345-368, September.
    2. Lewis, Philip E T & MacDonald, Garry, 2002. "The Elasticity of Demand for Labour in Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 78(240), pages 18-30, March.
    3. David H. Autor & Lawrence F. Katz & Melissa S. Kearney, 2005. "Trends in U.S. Wage Inequality: Re-Assessing the Revisionists," NBER Working Papers 11627, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • N4 - Economic History - - Government, War, Law, International Relations, and Regulation
    • H5 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies

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