IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Developing a Partial Equilibrium Model of an Urban Water System


  • Barker, Andrew

    (Productivity Commission)

  • Murray, Tim

    (Productivity Commission)

  • Salerian, John

    (Productivity Commission)


This Productivity Commission staff working paper (by Andrew Barker, Tim Murray and John Salerian) was released March 2010. Urban water and its management have been the subject of much public debate. The timing and choice of investments to augment water supply, different approaches to water pricing, and the tools of demand management have all been the subject of discussion. Outlined in this paper is a model that can be used to quantify the costs and benefits of policy options to improve outcomes in urban water systems. An earlier version of the paper was presented at the Australian Conference of Economists on 30 September 2009, and was awarded the prize for best contributed paper. The views expressed in this paper are those of the staff involved and do not necessarily reflect those of the Productivity Commission.

Suggested Citation

  • Barker, Andrew & Murray, Tim & Salerian, John, 2010. "Developing a Partial Equilibrium Model of an Urban Water System," Staff Working Papers 102, Productivity Commission, Government of Australia.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:prodsw:2010_002

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    File Function: Full PDF of report
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL:
    File Function: Publication webpage
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. R. Quentin Grafton & Tom Kompas, 2007. "Pricing Sydney water ," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 51(3), pages 227-241, September.
    2. Peterson, Deborah C. & Dwyer, Gavan & Appels, David & Fry, Jane, 2004. "Modelling Water Trade in the Southern Murray-Darling Basin," Staff Working Papers 31925, Productivity Commission.
    3. Andrew C. Worthington & Mark Hoffman, 2008. "An Empirical Survey Of Residential Water Demand Modelling," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(5), pages 842-871, December.
    4. Chow, Gregory C., 1997. "Dynamic Economics: Optimization by the Lagrange Method," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195101928.
    5. Geoff Edwards, 2006. "Whose Values Count? Demand Management for Melbourne's Water," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 82(s1), pages 54-63, September.
    6. R. Quentin Grafton & Michael B. Ward, 2008. "Prices versus Rationing: Marshallian Surplus and Mandatory Water Restrictions," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 84(s1), pages 57-65, September.
    7. Ronald Hochreiter & Georg Pflug, 2007. "Financial scenario generation for stochastic multi-stage decision processes as facility location problems," Annals of Operations Research, Springer, vol. 152(1), pages 257-272, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item


    water; water supply; water management; urban water;

    JEL classification:

    • C68 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computable General Equilibrium Models
    • Q25 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Water


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ris:prodsw:2010_002. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (MAPS). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.