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New incentives and old organizations: The production of violence after war

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  • Grandi, Francesca

    (Yale University)

Abstract

The immediate aftermath of an armed conflict is a key window of opportunity to build sustainable peace and security. Whether and how violence arises during that time has profound effects on a country’s political and economic development. Yet, defining and conceptualizing post-conflict violence has remained elusive. This paper contributes to a more comprehensive theory of postconflict violence with a theory-grounded typology, which classifies different postwar violent scenarios and shows that specific logics drive different types of violence in different settings. The axes, on which I build this typology, are: strategic aims (predatory, constructive) and organization (directed, coordinated, spontaneous). This classification is the first step toward a more rigorous understanding of post-conflict violence. Post-conflict violence emerges as a combination of new political incentives and opportunities from the war legacy. The premise of this theoretical effort is that with a more solid grasp of the mechanisms driving post-conflict violence and its variation we can design more suitable policies to lower its incidence. Ultimately, this analytical framework can illuminate the growing practice of international interventions in post-conflict settings.

Suggested Citation

  • Grandi, Francesca, 2013. "New incentives and old organizations: The production of violence after war," NEPS Working Papers 2/2013, Network of European Peace Scientists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:nepswp:2013_002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ghobarah, Hazem Adam & Huth, Paul & Russett, Bruce, 2003. "Civil Wars Kill and Maim People—Long After the Shooting Stops," American Political Science Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 97(2), pages 189-202, May.
    2. Thad Dunning, 2011. "Fighting and Voting: Violent Conflict and Electoral Politics," Journal of Conflict Resolution, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 55(3), pages 327-339, June.
    3. Dawn Brancati & Jack L. Snyder, 2011. "Rushing to the Polls: The Causes of Premature Postconflict Elections," Journal of Conflict Resolution, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 55(3), pages 469-492, June.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    postwar scenarios; post conflict violence;

    JEL classification:

    • D74 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Conflict; Conflict Resolution; Alliances; Revolutions
    • H56 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - National Security and War

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