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Economic growth in the US and the EU: a sectoral decomposition

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Abstract

Drawing on the OECD’s structural analysis (STAN)database, this paper contributes to the understanding of European economic growth through a decomposition into employment and productivity, across sectors, and across different time periods and countries. The US productivity surge from the mid-1990s continued for years after the bursting of the dot-com bubble. In the meantime, the EU-15’s relative productivity stagnation continued. The sectoral perspective helps us better understand this divergence. While manufacturing remains disproportionally important for aggregate productivity growth, the market services sector, given its size, accounts for the bulk of differences across countries, also within the EU. Market services differ from manufacturing in terms of the nature of innovation and other drivers of growth. This calls for sector-specific analysis when designing growth policy in Europe.

Suggested Citation

  • Uppenberg, Kristian, 2011. "Economic growth in the US and the EU: a sectoral decomposition," EIB Papers 2/2011, European Investment Bank, Economics Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:eibpap:2011_002
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    Cited by:

    1. Francesca Barbiero & Michael Blanga-Gubbay & Valeria Cipollone & Koen De Backer & Sébastien Miroudot & Alexandros Ragoussis & André Sapir & Reinhilde Veugelers & Erkki Vihriälä & Guntram B. Wolff & Ge, . "Manufacturing Europe’s future," Blueprints, Bruegel, number 795.
    2. Raquel Ortega-Argilés, 2012. "The Transatlantic Productivity Gap: A Survey Of The Main Causes," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 26(3), pages 395-419, July.
    3. Raquel Ortega-Argilés, 2013. "R&D, knowledge, economic growth and the transatlantic productivity gap," Chapters,in: Handbook of Industry Studies and Economic Geography, chapter 11, pages 271-302 Edward Elgar Publishing.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Productivity growth; European Union; services; manufacturing;

    JEL classification:

    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General
    • O52 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Europe

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