IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/rif/report/17.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Business and Intellectual Capital Development in Financial Riptide - Case Studies of Finnish Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical Companies Dispersing into Global Value Chains

Author

Listed:
  • Kulvik, Martti
  • Tähtinen, Marja
  • Ylä-Anttila, Pekka

Abstract

This study focused on two primary areas: 1. To determine what can be learned from biotech and drug development companies that suffered from financial problems and ultimately failed at the beginning of the 21st century. 2. To determine how intellectual capital developed in accordance with such companies and its fate following business failure. We examined six failed Finnish biotechnology companies and two major venture capital companies that have invested in Finnish biotechnology companies. We strongly emphasize that this research is only a case-based and very limited feasibility study. Nevertheless, the results were surprising. We found that intellectual capital was indeed created in the companies and that various aspects of this capital could be identified. To a certain extent, we were also able to follow the post-company steps of intellectual capital and the continuity of its value-creation in novel companies. The study was designed to involve only failed companies, but in four cases we found ourselves interviewing leaders of companies that had been created based on the IC of failed companies. It appears that important knowledge has vested by learning from earlier mistakes, and this learning period has created important intellectual capital that has already been exploited by various companies. Research-intensive companies typically operate in fields where failure is an inherent risk. Governments typically support emerging industries based on high-technology because of their growth potential. The combination of high-intensity R&D and high risks creates a problem for all investors. The created value is primarily in the form of intangible assets, which are not captured in traditional accounting and for which no well-established alternative metrics exist. Consequently, in the case of a company failure, most of the created value added is considered lost. This loss not only complicates the justification of government support policies but typically leads to high initial expectations of the sector that are unfortunately often followed by subsequent disappointments. We think that the present concept of failure may be profoundly misleading.

Suggested Citation

  • Kulvik, Martti & Tähtinen, Marja & Ylä-Anttila, Pekka, 2013. "Business and Intellectual Capital Development in Financial Riptide - Case Studies of Finnish Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical Companies Dispersing into Global Value Chains," ETLA Reports 17, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
  • Handle: RePEc:rif:report:17
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.etla.fi/wp-content/uploads/ETLA-Raportit-Reports-17.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Nikulainen, Tuomo & Tahvanainen, Antti-Jussi & Kulvik, Martti, 2012. "Expectations, Reality and Performance in the Finnish Biotechnology Business," Discussion Papers 1286, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
    2. Hyytinen, Ari & Määttänen, Niku & Lassila, Jukka & Valkonen, Tarmo, 2010. "Eläkevaroilla vauhtia Suomen talouskasvuun?," Discussion Papers 1224, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
    3. Hoetker, Glenn & Agarwal, Rajshree, 2005. "Death Hurts, But It Isn't Fatal: The Postexit Diffusion of Knowledge Created by Innovative Companies," Working Papers 05-0100, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, College of Business.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Intellectual capital; biotechnology companies; life science; knowledge recycling; venture capital; failed companies;

    JEL classification:

    • G24 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Investment Banking; Venture Capital; Brokerage
    • G33 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Bankruptcy; Liquidation
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • L65 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing - - - Chemicals; Rubber; Drugs; Biotechnology; Plastics
    • M13 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - New Firms; Startups
    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:rif:report:17. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Kaija Hyvönen-Rajecki) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/etlaafi.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.