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The Benefits of Achieving the Chesapeake Bay TMDLs (Total Maximum Daily Loads): A Scoping Study

  • Cropper, Maureen L.


    (Resources for the Future)

  • Isaac, William


    (Resources for the Future)

Concerns about nutrient pollution in the Chesapeake Bay have led to the establishment of pollution limits—total maximum daily loads (TMDLs)—which, by 2025, are expected to reduce nitrogen loadings to the Bay by 25 percent and phosphorous loadings by 24 percent from current levels. This paper outlines how the benefits associated with achieving the Chesapeake Bay TMDLs could be measured and monetized. We summarize studies that measure the benefits of improved water quality in the Bay and evaluate whether these studies could be used to value the water quality benefits associated with the TMDLs.In cases where studies conducted in the Bay watershed either do not exist or are out of date, we discuss whether results from studies conducted elsewhere could be transferred to the Chesapeake Bay. We also discuss original studies that would be useful to conduct in the future.

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Paper provided by Resources For the Future in its series Discussion Papers with number dp-11-31.

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Date of creation: 07 Sep 2011
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Handle: RePEc:rff:dpaper:dp-11-31
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  1. George R. Parsons & Mary Jo Kealy, 1992. "Randomly Drawn Opportunity Sets in a Random Utility Model of Lake Recreation," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 68(1), pages 93-106.
  2. Kahn, James R. & Kemp, W. Michael, 1985. "Economic losses associated with the degradation of an ecosystem: The case of submerged aquatic vegetation in Chesapeake Bay," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 246-263, September.
  3. Kevin J. Boyle & P. Joan Poor & Laura O. Taylor, 1999. "Estimating the Demand for Protecting Freshwater Lakes from Eutrophication," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 81(5), pages 1118-1122.
  4. von Haefen, Roger H., 2000. "Incorporating Observed Choice In The Construction Of Welfare Measures From Random Utility Models," 2000 Annual meeting, July 30-August 2, Tampa, FL 21836, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  5. P. Joan Poor & Kevin J. Boyle & Laura O. Taylor & Roy Bouchard, 2001. "Objective versus Subjective Measures of Water Clarity in Hedonic Property Value Models," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 77(4), pages 482-493.
  6. Poor, P. Joan & Pessagno, Keri L. & Paul, Robert W., 2007. "Exploring the hedonic value of ambient water quality: A local watershed-based study," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(4), pages 797-806, February.
  7. Yoshiaki Kaoru & V. Kerry Smith & Jin Long Liu, 1995. "Using Random Utility Models to Estimate the Recreational Value of Estuarine Resources," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 77(1), pages 141-151.
  8. Lipton, Douglas W., 2003. "The Value Of Improved Water Quality To Chesapeake Bay Boaters," Working Papers 28603, University of Maryland, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
  9. Morgan, Cynthia & Owens, Nicole, 2001. "Benefits of water quality policies: the Chesapeake Bay," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 271-284, November.
  10. Robert L. Hicks & Ivar E. Strand, 2000. "The Extent of Information: Its Relevance for Random Utility Models," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 76(3), pages 374-385.
  11. Huang, Ju-Chin & Boyle, Kevin J. & Halstead, John M. & Gibbs, Julie P., 2002. "An Hedonic Analysis of the Effects of Lake Water Clarity on New Hampshire Lakefront Properties," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 31(1), April.
  12. Van Houtven, George & Powers, John & Pattanayak, Subhrendu K., 2007. "Valuing water quality improvements in the United States using meta-analysis: Is the glass half-full or half-empty for national policy analysis?," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 206-228, September.
  13. Massey, D. Matthew & Newbold, Stephen C. & Gentner, Brad, 2006. "Valuing water quality changes using a bioeconomic model of a coastal recreational fishery," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 52(1), pages 482-500, July.
  14. Leggett, Christopher G. & Bockstael, Nancy E., 2000. "Evidence of the Effects of Water Quality on Residential Land Prices," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 121-144, March.
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