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A Model of Interbank Settlement

  • Benjamin Lester

    ()

    (Department of Economics University of Pennsylvania)

A settlement system is a set of rules and procedures that govern when and how funds are transferred between banks. Perhaps the most crucial feature of a settlement system is the frequency with which settlement occurs. On the one hand, a higher frequency of settlement limits the risk of default should a bank be rendered insolvent. On the other hand, a lower frequency of settlement is less costly for banks to operate. We construct a model of the banking sector in which this trade-off between cost and risk arises endogenously. We then complete the economy with a trading sector that has a micro-founded role for credit as a media of exchange. The result is a general equilibrium model that allows for welfare and policy analysis. We parameterize the economy and study the optimal intra-day borrowing policy that the operator of a settlement system should impose on member banks. We also determine conditions under which one settlement system is more appropriate than another

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Paper provided by Society for Economic Dynamics in its series 2006 Meeting Papers with number 282.

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Date of creation: 03 Dec 2006
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Handle: RePEc:red:sed006:282
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  1. Kahn, Charles M. & Roberds, William, 2001. "Real-time gross settlement and the costs of immediacy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(2), pages 299-319, April.
  2. Charles M. Kahn & William Roberds, 1997. "Payment system settlement and bank incentives," Proceedings 537, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  3. Michael J. Fleming & Kenneth D. Garbade, 2002. "When the back office moved to the front burner: settlement fails in the treasury market after 9/11," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Nov, pages 35-57.
  4. Thorsten Koeppl & Cyril Monnet & Ted Temzelides, 2005. "Mechanism Design and Payments," 2005 Meeting Papers 11, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  5. David C. Mills, Jr., 2005. "Alternative central bank credit policies for liquidity provision in a model of payments," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2005-55, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  6. Lester Benjamin, 2009. "Settlement Systems," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 9(1), pages 1-35, May.
  7. Rochet, Jean-Charles & Tirole, Jean, 1996. "Controlling Risk in Payment Systems," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 28(4), pages 832-62, November.
  8. Ping He & Lixin Huang & Randall Wright, 2005. "Money And Banking In Search Equilibrium," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 46(2), pages 637-670, 05.
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