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An analysis of recent survey data on the remittances of Pacific island migrants in Australia



We report initial findings from a household survey of Pacific island migrants and their remittances, conducted in 2010-11 in New South Wales (NSW). The study covers three Polynesian communities, Samoans and Tongans as in previous studies, but also Cook Islanders. We cover migrants in both Sydney and regional NSW. We quantify remittances of all types, formally and informally transferred, and distinguish those sent to households and organizations (mainly churches) or invested, beyond the migrants’ home country household, which account for almost 40% of total remittances. We provide the first estimates of remittances to Cook Islands since the mid-eighties, and the first estimates of remittances from regional areas in Australia. We investigate a number of potential socio-economic determinants of remittance behavior including the migrants’ income, duration of absence, strength of ties to home country, and major events in home country and Australia. We identify a number of important differences among the three groups, and between the Riverina- and Sydney-based communities. Areas for further research from this dataset are identified.

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  • Richard Brown & Gareth Leeves & Prabha Prayaga, 2012. "An analysis of recent survey data on the remittances of Pacific island migrants in Australia," Discussion Papers Series 457, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
  • Handle: RePEc:qld:uq2004:457

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    1. Marcel Fafchamps & David McKenzie & Simon Quinn & Christopher Woodruff, 2011. "When is capital enough to get female microenterprises growing? Evidence from a randomized experiment in Ghana," CSAE Working Paper Series 2011-11, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    2. Richard P.C. Brown & Eliana Jimenez, 2008. "Estimating the net effects of migration and remittances on poverty and inequality: comparison of Fiji and Tonga," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(4), pages 547-571.
    3. Eliana V. Jimenez-Soto & Richard P. C. Brown, 2012. "Assessing the Poverty Impacts of Migrants’ Remittances Using Propensity Score Matching: The Case of Tonga," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 88(282), pages 425-439, September.
    4. Eliana V. Jimenez & Richard P.C. Brown, 2008. "Assessing the poverty impacts of remittances with alternative counterfactual income estimates," Discussion Papers Series 375, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
    5. Esther Duflo & Christopher Udry, 2003. "Intrahousehold Resource Allocation in Côte D'ivoire: Social Norms, Separate Accounts and Consumption Choices," Working Papers 857, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    6. Ron Duncan & Satish Chand, 2002. "The Economics of the 'Arc of Instability'," Asian-Pacific Economic Literature, Asia Pacific School of Economics and Government, The Australian National University, vol. 16(1), pages 1-9, May.
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