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The Willingness To Pay By Households For Improved Reliability Of Electricity Service

Listed author(s):
  • Aygul Ozbafli

    ()

    (JDINT’L, Department of Economics, Queen’s University, Canada)

  • Glenn P. Jenkins

    ()

    (Queen’s University, Canada and Eastern Mediterranean University, North Cyprus)

This research examines households’ willingness to pay (WTP) for an improved electricity service. Households’ WTP is estimated using the contingent valuation (CV) method on data from 350 in-person interviews in North Cyprus. In order to avoid the cost of outages, households are willing to incur a 13.5% increase in their monthly electricity bill. A cost–benefit analysis (CBA) indicates that the annualized economic benefits of improved reliability of the electricity service would be approximately USD 37.8 million for the residential sector alone. This figure is more than enough to finance the investments needed to completely eradicate any electricity outages. In addition, the fuel savings from substituting the generation of the new plants for the old plants would yield about USD 44.6 million per year in fuel savings. Hence, a change from the current low-reliability policy to one of providing a high-quality service would yield an economic net present value to the residents of North Cyprus of over 2.5 times the investment costs or USD 226 million within five years.

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File URL: http://www.queensjdiexec.org/publications/qed_dp_272.pdf
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Paper provided by JDI Executive Programs in its series Development Discussion Papers with number 2015-02.

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Length: 34 pages
Date of creation: Feb 2015
Handle: RePEc:qed:dpaper:272
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  1. Anderson, Roland & Taylor, Lewis, 1986. "The social cost of unsupplied electricity : A critical review," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 139-146, July.
  2. Abdullah, Sabah & Mariel, Petr, 2010. "Choice experiment study on the willingness to pay to improve electricity services," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(8), pages 4570-4581, August.
  3. Carlsson, Fredrik & Martinsson, Peter, 2008. "Does it matter when a power outage occurs? -- A choice experiment study on the willingness to pay to avoid power outages," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 1232-1245, May.
  4. Caves, Douglas W & Herriges, Joseph A & Windle, Robert J, 1990. "Customer Demand for Service Reliability in the Electric Power Industry: A Synthesis of the Outage Cost Literature," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 42(2), pages 79-119, April.
  5. Alberini, Anna & Cropper, Maureen & Fu, Tsu-Tan & Krupnick, Alan & Liu, Jin-Tan & Shaw, Daigee & Harrington, Winston, 1997. "Valuing Health Effects of Air Pollution in Developing Countries: The Case of Taiwan," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 107-126, October.
  6. An, Mark Y. & Roberto Ayala, 1995. "A Mixture Model of Willingness to Pay Distributions," Working Papers 95-21, Duke University, Department of Economics.
  7. Fredrik Carlsson & Peter Martinsson, 2007. "Willingness to Pay among Swedish Households to Avoid Power Outages: A Random Parameter Tobit Model Approach," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 75-90.
  8. Carlsson, Fredrik & Martinsson, Peter, 2006. "Do Experience and Cheap Talk influence Willingness to Pay in an Open-Ended Contingent Valuation Survey?," Working Papers in Economics 190, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
  9. Bose, Ranjan Kumar & Shukla, Megha, 2001. "Electricity tariffs in India: an assessment of consumers' ability and willingness to pay in Gujarat," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 465-478, May.
  10. Giles Atkinson & Brett Day & Susana Mourato & Charles Palmer, 2004. "'Amenity' or 'eyesore'? Negative willingness to pay for options to replace electricity transmission towers," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(4), pages 203-208.
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