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Anonymous Markets and Monetary Trading

  • Aliprantis, C.D.
  • Camera, Gabriele
  • Puzzello, D.

We study an infinite-horizon economy with two basic frictions that are typical in monetary models. First, agents’ trading paths cross at most once due to pairwise trade and other meeting obstacles. Second, actions must be compatible with individual incentives due to commitment and enforcement limitations. We find that, with patient agents, relaxing the first friction by introducing centralized markets, opens the door to an informal enforcement scheme sustaining a non-monetary efficient allocation. Hence, we present a matching environment in which agents repeatedly access large markets and yet the basic frictions are retained. This allows the construction of models based on competitive markets in which money plays an essential role.

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File URL: http://www.krannert.purdue.edu/programs/phd/Working-paper-series/Year-2005/1179.pdf
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Paper provided by Purdue University, Department of Economics in its series Purdue University Economics Working Papers with number 1179.

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Length: 32 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:pur:prukra:1179
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Web page: http://www.krannert.purdue.edu/programs/phd

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  1. Neil Wallace, 1998. "A dictum for monetary theory," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Win, pages 20-26.
  2. Randall Wright & Guillame Rocheteau, 2003. "Money in Search Equilibrium, in Competitive Equilibrium, and in Competitive Search Equilibrium," Levine's Bibliography 666156000000000302, UCLA Department of Economics.
  3. Edward J. Green & Ruilin Zhou, . ""A Rudimentary Model of Search with Divisible Money and Prices''," CARESS Working Papres 95-17, University of Pennsylvania Center for Analytic Research and Economics in the Social Sciences.
  4. Joseph M. Ostroy, 1972. "The Informational Efficiency of Monetary Exchange," UCLA Economics Working Papers 021, UCLA Department of Economics.
  5. Kiyotaki, Nobuhiro & Wright, Randall, 1989. "On Money as a Medium of Exchange," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(4), pages 927-54, August.
  6. Camera, Gabriele, 2000. "Money, Search, And Costly Matchmaking," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 4(03), pages 289-323, September.
  7. Pesendorfer, Wolfgang & Levine, David & Fudenberg, Drew, 1998. "When Are Nonanonymous Players Negligible?," Scholarly Articles 3203775, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  8. Charalambos Aliprantis & Gabriele Camera & Daniela Puzzello, 2006. "Matching and anonymity," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 29(2), pages 415-432, October.
  9. Edward J. Green & Ruilin Zhou, 2002. "Dynamic Monetary Equilibrium in a Random Matching Economy," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 70(3), pages 929-969, May.
  10. Glenn Ellison, 1994. "Cooperation in the Prisoner's Dilemma with Anonymous Random Matching," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 61(3), pages 567-588.
  11. Araujo, Luis, 2004. "Social norms and money," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 241-256, March.
  12. Mark Huggett & Stefan Krasa, 1996. "Money and storage in a differential information economy (*)," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 8(2), pages 191-209.
  13. Ricardo Lagos & Randall Wright, 2002. "A unified framework for monetary theory and policy analysis," Working Paper 0211, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  14. Kocherlakota, Narayana R., 1998. "Money Is Memory," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 81(2), pages 232-251, August.
  15. Camera, G. & Corbae, D., 1998. "Money and Price Dispersion," Working Papers 98-03, University of Iowa, Department of Economics.
  16. Aleksander Berentsen & Gabriele Camera & C hristopher W aller, 2005. "The Distribution Of Money Balances And The Nonneutrality Of Money," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 46(2), pages 465-487, 05.
  17. Glen Ellison, 2010. "Cooperation in the Prisoner's Dilemma with Anonymous Random Matching," Levine's Working Paper Archive 631, David K. Levine.
  18. Nobuhiro Kiyotaki & John Moore, 2012. "Liquidity, Business Cycles, and Monetary Policy," NBER Working Papers 17934, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  19. Frank Hahn, 1973. "On Transaction Costs, Inessential Sequence Economies and Money," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 40(4), pages 449-461.
  20. Wolfgang Pesendorfer & David Levine, 1992. "When are Agents Negligible?," Discussion Papers 1018, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
  21. Michihiro Kandori, 1992. "Social Norms and Community Enforcement," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 59(1), pages 63-80.
  22. Hellwig, Martin F., 1993. "The challenge of monetary theory," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(2-3), pages 215-242, April.
  23. Aliprantis, C.D. & Camera, G. & Puzzello, D., 2007. "A random matching theory," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 59(1), pages 1-16, April.
  24. Boel, Paola & Camera, Gabriele, 2004. "Efficient Monetary Allocations and the Illiquidity of Bonds," Purdue University Economics Working Papers 1171, Purdue University, Department of Economics.
  25. Michi Kandori, 2010. "Social Norms and Community Enforcement," Levine's Working Paper Archive 630, David K. Levine.
  26. Green, Edward J., 1980. "Noncooperative price taking in large dynamic markets," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 155-182, April.
  27. Shouyong Shi, 1997. "A Divisible Search Model of Fiat Money," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 65(1), pages 75-102, January.
  28. Al-Najjar, Nabil I. & Smorodinsky, Rann, 2001. "Large Nonanonymous Repeated Games," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 26-39, October.
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