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Subjective Well-Being among Communities Left Behind by International Migrants

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  • Lara, Jaime

Abstract

This article assesses the impact of international migration on the subjective well-being of communities of origin in Mexico. Using a representative national survey and an empirical strategy with instrumental variables, we find that higher migratory intensity, at the municipal level, increases life satisfaction among men and women. There is a negative effect on emotional states of women, but an improvement in emotional states of men. Without controlling for schooling, a variable affected by international migration, men have a lower satisfaction with their perspective of future. Overall, the evidence in Mexico shows that the effects of international migration in the communities of origin are complex and with differential effects based on gender.

Suggested Citation

  • Lara, Jaime, 2018. "Subjective Well-Being among Communities Left Behind by International Migrants," MPRA Paper 87051, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:87051
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/87051/1/MPRA_paper_87051.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Francisca M. Antman, 2010. "Adult Child Migration and the Health of Elderly Parents Left behind in Mexico," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(2), pages 205-208, May.
    2. Ambrosius, Christian & Cuecuecha, Alfredo, 2013. "Are Remittances a Substitute for Credit? Carrying the Financial Burden of Health Shocks in National and Transnational Households," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 143-152.
    3. Nicole Fuentes & Mariano Rojas, 2001. "Economic Theory and Subjective Well-being: Mexico," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 53(3), pages 289-314, March.
    4. Demirgüç-Kunt, Asli & Córdova, Ernesto López & Pería, María Soledad Martínez & Woodruff, Christopher, 2011. "Remittances and banking sector breadth and depth: Evidence from Mexico," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(2), pages 229-241, July.
    5. David J. McKenzie & Nicole Hildebrandt, 2005. "The Effects of Migration on Child Health in Mexico," ECONOMIA JOURNAL, THE LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN ECONOMIC ASSOCIATION - LACEA, vol. 0(Fall 2005), pages 257-289, August.
    6. Steven Raphael, 2013. "International Migration, Sex Ratios, and the Socioeconomic Outcomes of Nonmigrant Mexican Women," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(3), pages 971-991, June.
    7. David McKenzie & Hillel Rapoport, 2011. "Can migration reduce educational attainment? Evidence from Mexico," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 24(4), pages 1331-1358, October.
    8. Woodruff, Christopher & Zenteno, Rene, 2007. "Migration networks and microenterprises in Mexico," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(2), pages 509-528, March.
    9. Clemens, Michael A. & Özden, Çağlar & Rapoport, Hillel, 2015. "Reprint of: Migration and Development Research is Moving Far Beyond Remittances," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 1-5.
    10. repec:spr:izamig:v:7:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1186_s40176-017-0102-6 is not listed on IDEAS
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    life satisfaction; emotions; Mexican migration;

    JEL classification:

    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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