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The economic value of the Earth's resources

  • Chichilnisky, Graciela

Economics is the driving force of today's widespread environmental destruction. Markets undervalue the earth's resources and compound their overuse. Since World War II the world has used resources voraciously. The situation can be described as the industrial countries overconsuming resources which are overextracted and exported by developing countries and traded at prices that are lower than the social costs. Resource-intensive patterns of growth and trade are inefficient for the world economy, and lead to tragic maldistribution of the Earth's riches. They should be replaced by knowledge-intensive patterns of growth. Information technology and the environmental agenda are the two most important trends in the world economy. Together they can lead to growth that is intrinsically compatible with the environment.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/8491/1/MPRA_paper_8491.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 8491.

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Date of creation: 1995
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Publication status: Published in Trends in Ecology and Evolution (TREE) No. 3.11(1996): pp. 135-140
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:8491
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Web page: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de

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  1. Chichilnisky, Graciela, 1996. "Trade regimes and GATT: resource-intensive vs. knowledge intensive growth," MPRA Paper 8493, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Chichilnisky, G. & Heal, G., 1993. "Global Environmental Risks," Discussion Papers 1993_03, Columbia University, Department of Economics.
  3. White, T Anderson & Runge, C Ford, 1994. "Common Property and Collective Action: Lessons from Cooperative Watershed Management in Haiti," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 43(1), pages 1-41, October.
  4. Graciela Chichilnisky & Geoffrey Heal, 1993. "Who Should Abate Carbon Emissions? An International Viewpoint," NBER Working Papers 4425, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Chichilnisky, Graciela, 1977. "Development patterns and the international order," MPRA Paper 7991, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Chichilnisky, G., 1993. "North-South Trade and the Dynamics of Renewable Resources," Discussion Papers 1993_02, Columbia University, Department of Economics.
  7. Chichilnisky, Graciela, 1994. "North-South Trade and the Global Environment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(4), pages 851-74, September.
  8. Chichilnisky, Graciela, 1981. "Terms of trade and domestic distribution : Export-led growth with abundant labour," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 163-192, April.
  9. Graciela Chichilnisky, 1997. "What Is Sustainable Development?," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 73(4), pages 467-491.
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