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Are Democratic Regimes Antithetical to Globalization?

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Abstract

In this study we have made an attempt to investigate into the relationship between political regime type (that ranges from authoritarian to democratic) and the extent of globalization, which of late has been considered as a path to development. We have made use of the Democracy index (and its constituent indicators) provided by the Economist Intelligence Unit and the globalization index (and its constituent indicators) of the KOF. Applying canonical correlation analysis on the data we have made an attempt to look into the response of globalization to the quantitative measures of democratic (versus authoritarian) practices of the governments in 116 countries distributed over Asia, Africa, Australia/Oceania, Europe and the Americas. We have also tested the Lee thesis in the context of globalization as a path to development. Our findings indicate that the empirical support to Lee’s thesis if extended to globalization as a path to development is superficial and does not withstand critical analysis. Contrary to Lee’s thesis, democracy promotes globalization. In African countries political discordance (at the national as well as international level) is not much favourable while in the Asian countries, political will, irrespective of regime type, is more or less in concordance with globalization. Therefore, rather illusively, it so appears that democracies thwart development as well as globalization as a means to development by implication, while the reality is very different.

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  • Mishra, SK, 2017. "Are Democratic Regimes Antithetical to Globalization?," MPRA Paper 83321, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:83321
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    Cited by:

    1. Sudhanshu K. Mishra, 2018. "A Study on Regime Type and Globalization in Simultaneous Equation Framework," Journal of Economics and Financial Analysis, Tripal Publishing House, vol. 2(1), pages 99-128.
    2. Mishra, SK, 2017. "A New Kind of Two-Stage Least Squares Based on Shapley Value Regression," MPRA Paper 83534, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Globalization; democracy; authoritarian regime; Lee thesis; canonical correlation; Asia; Africa; Australia; Europe; the Americas;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F63 - International Economics - - Economic Impacts of Globalization - - - Economic Development
    • O51 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - U.S.; Canada
    • O52 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Europe
    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East
    • O54 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Latin America; Caribbean
    • O55 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Africa
    • O56 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Oceania
    • O57 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Comparative Studies of Countries

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