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Vouchers, tests, loans, privatization: Will they help (fight) higher education corruption in Russia?

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  • Osipian, Ararat

Abstract

Russian higher education is in the process of reforming. Introduction of the standardized computer-graded test and educational vouchers was intended to increase accessibility of higher education, make its funding more effective, and reduce corruption in admissions to public colleges. The idea of vouchers failed while the test faces furious opposition and crises. This paper considers vouchers, standardized tests, educational loans, and privatization as related to educational corruption. The test is criticized by many for being a cause of the further increase in educational corruption. However, the test is needed to replace the outdated admissions policy based on the entry examinations. This paper considers the growing de facto privatization of the nation’s higher education as a fundamental process that should be legalized and formalized. It suggests further restructuring of the higher education industry, its decentralization and privatization, and sees educational loans as a necessary part of the future system of educational funding.

Suggested Citation

  • Osipian, Ararat, 2007. "Vouchers, tests, loans, privatization: Will they help (fight) higher education corruption in Russia?," MPRA Paper 7595, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:7595
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/7595/1/MPRA_paper_7595.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Georgy Petrov & Paul Temple, 2004. "Corruption in Higher Education: Some Findings from the States of the Former Soviet Union," Higher Education Management and Policy, OECD Publishing, vol. 16(1), pages 83-99.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    corruption; education; loans; privatization; reform; Russia; vouchers;

    JEL classification:

    • D73 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Bureaucracy; Administrative Processes in Public Organizations; Corruption
    • P36 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - Consumer Economics; Health; Education and Training; Welfare, Income, Wealth, and Poverty

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