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Land Market Restrictions, Women's Labor Force Participation and Wages

Author

Listed:
  • Emran, M. Shahe
  • Shilpi, Forhad

Abstract

We analyze the effects of land market restrictions on the rural labor market outcomes for women. The land restrictions can have a gender and age bias because of an ex-post asymmetry in migration costs arising from older women's comparative advantage in home goods production. For identification, we exploit a natural experiment in Sri Lanka where historical malaria played a unique role in land policy. We provide robust evidence of a positive effect of land restrictions on women's labor force participation, and negative effects on female wages. The empirical results suggest that the burden of land market restrictions falls disproportionately on older women.

Suggested Citation

  • Emran, M. Shahe & Shilpi, Forhad, 2014. "Land Market Restrictions, Women's Labor Force Participation and Wages," MPRA Paper 57989, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:57989
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/62068/18/MPRA_paper_62068.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Land Market Restrictions; Labor Market; Women's Labor Force Participation; Wage; Sri Lanka; Historical Malaria;

    JEL classification:

    • J3 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs
    • J4 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development

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