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The Tiebout Hypothesis in the United States: An Analysis of Black Consumer-Voters, 1970-75

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Listed:
  • Cebula, Richard
  • Avery, Leslie

Abstract

This study provides a preliminary empirical investigation as to whether black-consumer voters were attracted by the prospect of higher AFDC benefits as they made interstate migration decisions over the 1970-75 time period. Unlike most previous studies, there was no compelling evidence of such a attraction. Of course, this study is only preliminary, and one could easily make an argument that there are omitted variables from the estimating equations.

Suggested Citation

  • Cebula, Richard & Avery, Leslie, 1982. "The Tiebout Hypothesis in the United States: An Analysis of Black Consumer-Voters, 1970-75," MPRA Paper 51648, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:51648
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/51648/1/MPRA_paper_51648.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Cebula, Richard & Schaffer, Beverly, 1974. "Analysis of Net Interstate Migration: Comment," MPRA Paper 50962, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Kohn, Robert & Vedder, Richard & Cebula, Richard, 1972. "Determinants of Interstate Migration, By Race, 1965-1970," MPRA Paper 52311, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Cebula, Richard, 1973. "Local Government Policies and Migration: An Analysis for SMSAs in the United States, 1965-1970," MPRA Paper 50068, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 02 Feb 1974.
    4. Cebula, Richard, 1973. "Interstate Migration and the Tiebout Hypothesis: An Analysis According to Race, Sex, and Age," MPRA Paper 49827, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 01 Feb 1974.
    5. Richard Cebula, 1976. "A note on nonwhite migration, welfare levels, and the political process," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 28(1), pages 117-119, December.
    6. Charles M. Tiebout, 1956. "A Pure Theory of Local Expenditures," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 64, pages 416-416.
    7. Kenneth Greene, 1977. "Spillovers, migration and public school expenditures: The repetition of an experiment," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 29(1), pages 85-93, March.
    8. Richard Cebula, 1977. "An analysis of migration patterns and local government policy toward public education in the United States," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 32(1), pages 113-121, December.
    9. Richard J. Cebula, 1978. "An Empirical Note on the Tiebout-Tullock Hypothesis," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 92(4), pages 705-711.
    10. Fields, Gary S, 1976. "Labor Force Migration, Unemployment and Job Turnover," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 58(4), pages 407-415, November.
    11. Richard Cebula, 1974. "Local government policies and migration," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 19(1), pages 85-93, September.
    12. Rishi Kumar, 1977. "More on nonwhite migration, welfare levels, and the political process," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 32(1), pages 151-154, December.
    13. Cebula, Richard, 1978. "The Determinants of Human Migration," MPRA Paper 58401, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    collective decision making; welfare magnet; black migration;

    JEL classification:

    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • D78 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Positive Analysis of Policy Formulation and Implementation
    • H31 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - Household
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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