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Institutional Barrier and the World Income Distribution

  • Costa Junior, Celso Jose

The objective of this paper is to discuss the relationship of the openness and the impact of institutional reforms in the participation of the product of individual countries in global output. Therefore, it is based on economic simulations, a type of alternative approach that uses mathematical techniques and deductions to solve an objective model. The economic simulation of this work reflects that the trade opening level is an important factor of weight for possible institutional alterations in the economies. It is noticeable that, in the countries with low opening level, the cost of the capital is the main setback for the economic growth. And, in those economies with high opening level, the largest dynamics would compensate the problems caused by the cost of the capital. When compared the two types of reforms (continuous versus punctual), the "continuous" reform will bring a more expressive gain quality of the relative product than the "punctual" reform.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/45633/1/MPRA_paper_45633.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 45633.

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Date of creation: 2012
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:45633
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  1. Haddad, Mona & Lim, Jamus Jerome & Pancaro, Cosimo & Saborowski, Christian, 2012. "Trade openness reduces growth volatility when countries are well diversified," Working Paper Series 1491, European Central Bank.
  2. Mahir Binici & Yin-Wong Cheung & Kon S. Lai, 2012. "Trade Openness, Market Competition, and Inflation : Some Sectoral Evidence from OECD Countries," Working Papers 1206, Research and Monetary Policy Department, Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey.
  3. Robert J. Barro, 1996. "Determinants of Economic Growth: A Cross-Country Empirical Study," NBER Working Papers 5698, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Aisen, Ari & Veiga, Francisco José, 2013. "How does political instability affect economic growth?," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 151-167.
  5. Acemoglu, Daron & Ventura, Jaume, 2001. "The World Income Distribution," CEPR Discussion Papers 2973, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  6. Carlos ALBERTO CINQUETTI & Ricardo GONÇALVES SILVA, 2008. "Delays In Stabilization Or In Reforms? The Debt Crisis," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 46(3), pages 290-314.
  7. Dias, Joilson & Tebaldi, Edinaldo, 2012. "Institutions, human capital, and growth: The institutional mechanism," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 300-312.
  8. Dani Rodrik, 2007. "Introductiion to One Economics, Many Recipes: Globalization, Institutions, and Economic Growth
    [One Economics, Many Recipes: Globalization, Institutions, and Economic Growth]
    ," Introductory Chapters, Princeton University Press.
  9. Kenneth L. Judd, 1998. "Numerical Methods in Economics," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262100711, June.
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