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Rentes et corruption au maroc théorie et evidence
[Morocco rents and corruption theory and evidence]

Author

Listed:
  • Jellal, Mohamed
  • Bouzahzah, Mohamed

Abstract

This paper is part of a large research agenda by our Institute on the causes and consequences of moroccan corruption . This paper analyzes theoretically and empirically the main determinants of firms corruption in Morocco firms in the formal sector. It is shown that the presence of rents linked to favoritism and patronage practices is fundamental in explaining corruption. This endemic corruption can then explain the lack of productive performance of Moroccan firms. Institutional reforms would greatly be desirable to encourage efficiency in the industrial sector which is the main engine of economic growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Jellal, Mohamed & Bouzahzah, Mohamed, 2012. "Rentes et corruption au maroc théorie et evidence
    [Morocco rents and corruption theory and evidence]
    ," MPRA Paper 38750, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:38750
    as

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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/38750/1/MPRA_paper_38750.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Simeon Djankov & Rafael La Porta & Florencio Lopez-de-Silanes & Andrei Shleifer, 2002. "The Regulation of Entry," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(1), pages 1-37.
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    3. Lambsdorff, Johann Graf, 2002. "Corruption and Rent-Seeking," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 113(1-2), pages 97-125, October.
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    6. Gary S. Becker & George J. Stigler, 1974. "Law Enforcement, Malfeasance, and Compensation of Enforcers," The Journal of Legal Studies, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(1), pages 1-18, January.
    7. Douglas Hibbs & Violeta Piculescu, 2005. "Institutions, Corruption and Tax Evasion in the Unofficial Economy," Public Economics 0508003, EconWPA.
    8. Bliss, Christopher & Di Tella, Rafael, 1997. "Does Competition Kill Corruption?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 105(5), pages 1001-1023, October.
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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Corruption; firms; rents; favoritism; competition policy; morocco;

    JEL classification:

    • L5 - Industrial Organization - - Regulation and Industrial Policy
    • D73 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Bureaucracy; Administrative Processes in Public Organizations; Corruption
    • D21 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Firm Behavior: Theory
    • K21 - Law and Economics - - Regulation and Business Law - - - Antitrust Law

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