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Capital Income and Income Inequality: Evidence from Urban China

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  • Chi, Wei

Abstract

Using urban household survey data collected by National Bureau of Statistics of China from 1988-2009, this study examines the distribution, composition, and changes of capital income and its contribution to income inequality. The data shows that capital income has increased considerably in past 20 years in urban China. Although the average value of capital income is still relatively low, the dispersion of capital income is significant, and for high-income earners capital income is substantial. Compared to other forms of income, capital income is distributed the most unequally, and its contribution to total income inequality has been growing. This study also examines capital income in China’s western, central, and eastern regions separately, and finds that capital income is highest and contributes the most to income inequality in the eastern region.

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  • Chi, Wei, 2011. "Capital Income and Income Inequality: Evidence from Urban China," MPRA Paper 34521, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:34521
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    1. repec:spr:lsprsc:v:10:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s12076-017-0192-z is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Kanbur, Ravi & Wang, Yue & Zhang, Xiaobo, 2017. "The Great Chinese Inequality Turnaround," IZA Discussion Papers 10635, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Thomas Piketty & Li Yang & Gabriel Zucman, 2017. "Capital Accumulation, Private Property and Rising Inequality in China, 1978-2015," NBER Working Papers 23368, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Molero-Simarro, Ricardo, 2017. "Inequality in China revisited. The effect of functional distribution of income on urban top incomes, the urban-rural gap and the Gini index, 1978–2015," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 101-117.
    5. Jin, Hailong & Qian, Hang & Wang, Tong & Choi, E. Kwan, 2014. "Income distribution in urban China: An overlooked data inconsistency issue," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 383-396.
    6. Meltem Ucal & Alfred Albert Haug & Mehmet Hüseyin Bilgin, 2016. "Income inequality and FDI: evidence with Turkish data," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(11), pages 1030-1045, March.
    7. Herzer, Dierk & Nunnenkamp, Peter, 2012. "FDI and health in developed economies: A panel cointegration analysis," Kiel Working Papers 1756, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    8. Herzer, Dierk & Nunnenkamp, Peter, 2012. "The effect of foreign aid on income inequality: Evidence from panel cointegration," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 245-255.
    9. Riccardo Leoncini, 2017. "Innovation, inequality and the skill premium," SPRU Working Paper Series 2017-16, SPRU - Science and Technology Policy Research, University of Sussex.
    10. Thomas Piketty & Li Yang & Gabriel Zucman, 2018. "Capital Accumulation, Private Property and Rising Inequality in China, 1978-2015," HKUST IEMS Working Paper Series 2018-54, HKUST Institute for Emerging Market Studies, revised Mar 2018.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    capital income; income inequality; regional income gaps; Gini coefficient;

    JEL classification:

    • J3 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs

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