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A critical realist interpretation of evolutionary growth theorising

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  • Castellacci, Fulvio

Abstract

The article discusses a critical realist interpretation of evolutionary growth theorising by focusing on some of its basic characteristics. The evolutionary ontology is complex, differentiated, structured, systemic, open, ever-changing, and radically uncertain. Its methodology tends to be increasingly based on appreciative theorising, retroductive explanations and interdisciplinary analysis. After discussing these features, the article suggests that critical realism may indeed constitute an important philosophical and methodological foundation for the future development of evolutionary theories of economic growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Castellacci, Fulvio, 2005. "A critical realist interpretation of evolutionary growth theorising," MPRA Paper 27603, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:27603
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Malerba, Franco, 2002. "Sectoral systems of innovation and production," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 247-264, February.
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    8. Stephen Pratten, 2005. "Economics as progress: the LSE approach to econometric modelling and critical realism as programmes for research," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 29(2), pages 179-205, March.
    9. Northover, Patricia, 1999. "Evolutionary Growth Theory and Forms of Realism," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 23(1), pages 33-63, January.
    10. Richard R. Nelson & Sidney G. Winter, 2002. "Evolutionary Theorizing in Economics," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(2), pages 23-46, Spring.
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    12. Lawson, Tony, 1989. "Abstraction, Tendencies and Stylised Facts: A Realist Approach to Economic Analysis," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 13(1), pages 59-78, March.
    13. Malerba, Franco, et al, 1999. "'History-Friendly' Models of Industry Evolution: The Computer Industry," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 8(1), pages 3-40, March.
    14. G. Silverberg & B. Verspagen, 1995. "Evolutionary Theorizing on Economic Growth," Working Papers wp95078, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis.
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    Cited by:

    1. Fulvio Castellacci, 2007. "Technological regimes and sectoral differences in productivity growth ," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(6), pages 1105-1145, December.
    2. Ron Martin & Peter Sunley, 2010. "Complexity Thinking and Evolutionary Economic Geography," Chapters,in: The Handbook of Evolutionary Economic Geography, chapter 4 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. repec:ucm:wpaper:05-13 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Isabel Álvarez González & Romilio Labra, 2013. "Identifying the role of natural resources in knowledge-based strategies of development," Working Papers del Instituto Complutense de Estudios Internacionales 1305, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Instituto Complutense de Estudios Internacionales.
    5. He, Zheng & Rayman-Bacchus, Lez & Wu, Yiming, 2011. "Self-organization of industrial clustering in a transition economy: A proposed framework and case study evidence from China," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(9), pages 1280-1294.
    6. Ron Boschma & Ron Martin, 2010. "The Aims and Scope of Evolutionary Economic Geography," Chapters,in: The Handbook of Evolutionary Economic Geography, chapter 1 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    7. Ron Martin & Peter Sunley, 2015. "Towards a Developmental Turn in Evolutionary Economic Geography?," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(5), pages 712-732, May.
    8. Ron Martin & Peter Sunley, 2010. "The Place of Path Dependence in an Evolutionary Perspective on the Economic Landscape," Chapters,in: The Handbook of Evolutionary Economic Geography, chapter 3 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    9. Elsner, Wolfram, 2015. "Policy Implications of Economic Complexity and Complexity Economics," MPRA Paper 63252, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Chang-Yang Lee, 2012. "Learning-by-doing in R&D, knowledge threshold, and technological divide," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 22(1), pages 109-132, January.
    11. Dopfer, Kurt & Potts, Jason, 2010. "Why evolutionary realism underpins evolutionary economic analysis and theory: A reply to Runde's critique," Journal of Institutional Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 6(03), pages 401-413, September.
    12. Maria Lúcia Pato & Aurora A.C. Teixeira, 2013. "Twenty years of rural entrepreneurship: a bibliometric survey," FEP Working Papers 516, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Critical realism; evolutionary economics; innovation; economic growth;

    JEL classification:

    • B52 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - Historical; Institutional; Evolutionary
    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General
    • B41 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Economic Methodology - - - Economic Methodology

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