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Borrowing Constraint and the Effect of Option Introduction


  • Amira, Khaled
  • Bennour, Khaled


This paper studies how options trading, by circumventing constraints on borrowing, permits optimistic investors to hold the desired portfolio. Unconstrained investors proceed to a portfolio rebalancing by constructing a zero-income portfolio that consists of a short position in the option, a long position in the stock and a short position in the riskless asset. We show that aggregate demand for the stock is what prevails when options do not exist and no constraints hold. Furthermore, the option listing causes an increase in the aggregate demand for the stock and consequently an increase in the equilibrium stock price.

Suggested Citation

  • Amira, Khaled & Bennour, Khaled, 2010. "Borrowing Constraint and the Effect of Option Introduction," MPRA Paper 26440, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:26440

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Detemple, Jerome B & Selden, Larry, 1991. "A General Equilibrium Analysis of Option and Stock Market Interactions," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 32(2), pages 279-303, May.
    2. Grossman, Sanford J, 1988. "An Analysis of the Implications for Stock and Futures Price Volatility of Program Trading and Dynamic Hedging Strategies," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 61(3), pages 275-298, July.
    3. Stein, Jeremy C, 1987. "Informational Externalities and Welfare-Reducing Speculation," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 95(6), pages 1123-1145, December.
    4. Nicolae Garleanu & Lasse Heje Pedersen & Allen M. Poteshman, 2009. "Demand-Based Option Pricing," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 22(10), pages 4259-4299, October.
    5. Back, Kerry, 1993. "Asymmetric Information and Options," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 6(3), pages 435-472.
    6. Conrad, Jennifer, 1989. " The Price Effect of Option Introduction," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 44(2), pages 487-498, June.
    7. Santa-Clara, Pedro & Saretto, Alessio, 2009. "Option strategies: Good deals and margin calls," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 391-417, August.
    8. Stephen A. Ross, 1976. "Options and Efficiency," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 90(1), pages 75-89.
    9. Hart, Oliver D., 1975. "On the optimality of equilibrium when the market structure is incomplete," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 418-443, December.
    10. Jérôme Detemple & Angel Serrat, 2003. "Dynamic Equilibrium with Liquidity Constraints," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 16(2), pages 597-629.
    11. Shleifer, Andrei, 1986. " Do Demand Curves for Stocks Slope Down?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 41(3), pages 579-590, July.
    12. Biais, Bruno & Hillion, Pierre, 1994. "Insider and Liquidity Trading in Stock and Options Markets," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 7(4), pages 743-780.
    13. Detemple, Jerome & Jorion, Philippe, 1990. "Option listing and stock returns : An empirical analysis," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 14(4), pages 781-801, October.
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    More about this item


    options; credit constraints; stock price; arbitrage;

    JEL classification:

    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions
    • G13 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Contingent Pricing; Futures Pricing

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