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Is Canadian Immigration too high? A Labour Market and Productivity Perspective

  • Grady, Patrick

This paper presents some of the economic considerations that should underlie Canadian immigration policy from the point of view of an economist. It then reviews the available data on the performance of recent immigrants against this backdrop. It also offers some observations on the changes in the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act contained in Bill C-50, the Budget Implementation Act, 2008. Finally, it concludes with some suggestions for the conduct of an immigration policy that would be based more on Canada’s economic interests and that would establish a lower annual target for immigration more consistent with Canada’s absorptive capacity.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/25221/1/MPRA_paper_25221.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 25221.

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Date of creation: 05 Oct 2008
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:25221
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  1. David Card, 2004. "Is the New Immigration Really So Bad?," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 0402, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  2. Picot, Garnett & Sweetman, Arthur, 2005. "The Deteriorating Economic Welfare of Immigrants and Possible Causes: Update 2005," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2005262e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
  3. Someshwar Rao & Jianmin Tang & Weimin Wang, 2003. "Canada's Recent Productivity Record and Capital Accumulation," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 7, pages 24-38, Fall.
  4. George J. Borjas, 2003. "The Labor Demand Curve Is Downward Sloping: Reexamining The Impact Of Immigration On The Labor Market," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 118(4), pages 1335-1374, November.
  5. Hou, Feng & Picot, Garnett & Coulombe, Simon, 2007. "Chronic Low Income and Low-income Dynamics Among Recent Immigrants," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2007294e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
  6. Joseph Schaafsma & Arthur Sweetman, 2001. "Immigrant earnings: age at immigration matters," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 34(4), pages 1066-1099, November.
  7. Hou, Feng & Picot, Garnett, 2003. "The Rise in Low-income Rates Among Immigrants in Canada," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2003198e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
  8. Abdurrahman Aydemir & George J. Borjas, 2006. "A Comparative Analysis of the Labor Market Impact of International Migration: Canada, Mexico, and the United States," NBER Working Papers 12327, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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