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Tendency of corruption and its determinants among public servants: A case study on Malaysia

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  • Duasa, Jarita

Abstract

This study attempts to analyze determinants of corruption tendency on a single country, namely Malaysia, using cross-sectional data. Using survey questions on sample of respondents in two states of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur and Selangor, data are collected and logit model is developed for estimation. The results from the regression on sample indicate that age negatively contributes to corruption tendency among government servants. The results also show that there are two departments, namely Police and Immigration departments, which have high probability of corruption and large spending, in particular, payments of personal debt, is positively contribute to high tendency of corruption among government servants.

Suggested Citation

  • Duasa, Jarita, 2008. "Tendency of corruption and its determinants among public servants: A case study on Malaysia," MPRA Paper 11562, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:11562
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/11562/1/MPRA_paper_11562.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Roberto Burguet & Yeon-Koo Che, 2004. "Competitive Procurement with Corruption," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 35(1), pages 50-68, Spring.
    2. Shang-Jin Wei, 2000. "How Taxing is Corruption on International Investors?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 82(1), pages 1-11, February.
    3. Ades, Alberto & Di Tella, Rafael, 1997. "National Champions and Corruption: Some Unpleasant Interventionist Arithmetic," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 107(443), pages 1023-1042, July.
    4. Johann Graf Lambsdorff, 2003. "How Corruption Affects Productivity," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 56(4), pages 457-474, November.
    5. Isaac Ehrlich & Francis T. Lui, 1999. "Bureaucratic Corruption and Endogenous Economic Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(S6), pages 270-293, December.
    6. Hauk, Esther & Saez-Marti, Maria, 2002. "On the Cultural Transmission of Corruption," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 107(2), pages 311-335, December.
    7. Rafael Di Tella & Alberto Ades, 1999. "Rents, Competition, and Corruption," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(4), pages 982-993, September.
    8. Paolo Mauro, 1996. "The Effects of Corruptionon Growth, Investment, and Government Expenditure," IMF Working Papers 96/98, International Monetary Fund.
    9. Mo, Pak Hung, 2001. "Corruption and Economic Growth," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 66-79, March.
    10. Paolo Mauro, 1995. "Corruption and Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(3), pages 681-712.
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    Cited by:

    1. Moamen Gouda & Sang-Min Park, 2014. "Religious Loyalty and Acceptance of Corruption," Working Papers 855, Economic Research Forum, revised Nov 2014.
    2. Gouda Moamen & Park Sang-Min, 2015. "Religious Loyalty and Acceptance of Corruption," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 235(2), pages 184-206, April.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Tendency of corruption; public servants; Logit model;

    JEL classification:

    • C42 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Survey Methods
    • C31 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models; Quantile Regressions; Social Interaction Models
    • H00 - Public Economics - - General - - - General

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