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Are Recent Immigrants Different? A New Profile of Immigrants in the OECD based on DIOC 2005/06

Author

Listed:
  • Sarah Widmaier

    (OECD)

  • Jean-Christophe Dumont

    (OECD)

Abstract

Increasing international migration and changing immigrant populations in OECD countries make international comparable data on migrant populations essential. These data should be updated regularly to capture a detailed picture of migrant populations. This document presents the first results of the update of the Database on Immigrants in OECD Countries (DIOC) for the years 2005/06. It describes immigrant and emigrant populations by socio-demographic characteristics and labour market outcomes in the OECD, as well as updated “brain drain” figures. In 2005/06, 10.8% of the population in the OECD was foreign-born, representing 91 million persons. Latin American and African migrant populations increased by more than 30% between 2000 and 2005/06, slightly more than that of Asian migrants (27%). Labour market outcomes of immigrants vary by region and country of origin, but they improved significantly since 2000. In many OECD countries, low-educated foreign-born fare better on the labour market than their native-born counterparts, but high-educated migrants tend to have lower employment rates and higher unemployment rates than their native-born counterparts...

Suggested Citation

  • Sarah Widmaier & Jean-Christophe Dumont, 2011. "Are Recent Immigrants Different? A New Profile of Immigrants in the OECD based on DIOC 2005/06," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 126, OECD Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:oec:elsaab:126-en
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/5kg3ml17nps4-en
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    Cited by:

    1. Lin, Xiaohua & Yang, Xiyan, 2017. "From human capital externality to entrepreneurial aspiration: Revisiting the migration-trade linkage," Journal of World Business, Elsevier, vol. 52(3), pages 360-371.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    database; DIOC; education; emigrants; emigration rates; immigrants; international migration; migrant stocks; skills;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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