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Public Employment and Regional Risk Sharing: Norway 1977-90


  • Egil Matsen

    () (Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology)

  • Lars-Erik Borge

    () (Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology)


We provide an empirical analysis of regional risk sharing in Norway over the period 1977-90. The approach of Asdrubali, Sørensen and Yosha (1996) is extended to take account of public employment as a possible shock absorber. The other channels of risk sharing are capital markets & commuting, taxes & transfers and credit markets. Surprisingly, there seems to be full interregional risk sharing in the short run, with public employment absorbing about 20 % of regional shocks to private output. The combined effect of capital markets & commuting is even more important, however, absorbing up to 70 % of regional shocks. In the longer run, a significant fraction of regional shocks remain unsmoothed. Government smoothing increases and market based smoothing decreases as shocks become more permanent.

Suggested Citation

  • Egil Matsen & Lars-Erik Borge, 2001. "Public Employment and Regional Risk Sharing: Norway 1977-90," Working Paper Series 0802, Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
  • Handle: RePEc:nst:samfok:0802

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    7. Maurice Obstfeld., 1993. "Are Industrial-Country Consumption Risks Globally Diversified?," Center for International and Development Economics Research (CIDER) Working Papers C93-014, University of California at Berkeley.
    8. Backus, David K & Kehoe, Patrick J & Kydland, Finn E, 1992. "International Real Business Cycles," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(4), pages 745-775, August.
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