IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Migration, Remittances and Competition in International Labour Market

  • Mehdi M. Chowdhury

Remittances are considered as an important component of GDP in many developing countries. In order to increase remittance inflows many countries are now actively involved in labour export and thereby competing with other labour exporting countries in the international market. In this paper we have conceptualised the competition by proposing a model where two countries export labour to a third country. The third country imposes differential tax rates on the income of foreign workers. We have explored the process of imposition of tax rates by importing country and found that tax burden is higher for the country with higher labour endowment.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/credit/documents/papers/09-02.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by University of Nottingham, CREDIT in its series Discussion Papers with number 09/02.

as
in new window

Length:
Date of creation:
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:not:notcre:09/02
Contact details of provider: Postal: School of Economics University of Nottingham University Park Nottingham NG7 2RD
Phone: (44) 0115 951 5620
Fax: (0115) 951 4159
Web page: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/economics/

More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Chau, Nancy H. & Kanbur, Ravi, 2000. "The Race to the Bottom, From the Bottom," Working Papers 127681, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
  2. Yutaka Horiba & Shunichi Tsutsui, 2000. "International Duopoly, Tariff Policy and the Superiority of Free Trade," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 51(2), pages 207-220, 06.
  3. Pei-Cheng Liao & Kar-yiu Wong, 2006. "Uniform versus Discriminatory Tariffs: When Will Export Taxes Be Used?," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 72(4), pages 915–925, April.
  4. Schiff, Maurice, 2005. "Brain gain : claims about its size and impact on welfare and growth are greatly exaggerated," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3708, The World Bank.
  5. Razin, Assaf & Sadka, Efraim & Swagel, Phillip, 2002. "Tax burden and migration: a political economy theory and evidence," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(2), pages 167-190, August.
  6. Willi Leibfritz & Paul O'Brien & Jean-Christophe Dumont, 2003. "Effects of Immigration on Labour Markets and Government Budgets - An Overview," CESifo Working Paper Series 874, CESifo Group Munich.
  7. Guillermina Jasso & Mark R. Rosenzweig & James P. Smith, 1998. "The Changing Skills of New Immigrants to the United States: Recent Trends and Their Determinants," NBER Working Papers 6764, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Bhagwati, Jagdish & Hamada, Koichi, 1974. "The brain drain, international integration of markets for professionals and unemployment : A theoretical analysis," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 1(1), pages 19-42, April.
  9. Hong Hwang & Chao-Cheng Mai, 1991. "Optimum Discriminatory Tariffs under Oligopolistic Competition," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 24(3), pages 693-702, August.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:not:notcre:09/02. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Hilary Hughes)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.