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Reputational Concerns in Repeated Rent-Seeking Contests

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Listed:
  • Francesco Fallucchi

    () (School of Economics, University of East Anglia)

  • Elke Renner

    () (School of Economics, University of Nottingham)

Abstract

We experimentally investigate how reputational concerns affect behavior in repeated Tullock contests by comparing expenditures of participants interacting in fixed groups with the expenditures of participants interacting with randomly changing opponents. When participants receive full information about the choices and earnings of all contestants at the end of each contest we find no difference between contest expenditures in fixed and randomly changing groups. However, when participants only observe their own earnings at the end of each contest they are significantly more aggressive when they interact in fixed groups. This result can be explained by a dominance or status seeking motive.

Suggested Citation

  • Francesco Fallucchi & Elke Renner, 2016. "Reputational Concerns in Repeated Rent-Seeking Contests," Discussion Papers 2016-05, The Centre for Decision Research and Experimental Economics, School of Economics, University of Nottingham.
  • Handle: RePEc:not:notcdx:2016-05
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Konrad, Kai A., 2009. "Strategy and Dynamics in Contests," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199549603.
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    12. Andrew E. Clark & Paul Frijters & Michael A. Shields, 2008. "Relative Income, Happiness, and Utility: An Explanation for the Easterlin Paradox and Other Puzzles," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 46(1), pages 95-144, March.
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    Keywords

    Contests; experiments; matching protocol; information feedback;

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