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What Drove the Crop Price Hikes in the Food Crisis?

  • Tetsuji Tanaka

    (School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London)

  • Nobuhiro Hosoe

    (National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies)

In the late 2000s, the world grain markets experienced severe turbulence with rapid crop price rises caused by bad crops, oil price hikes, export restrictions, and the emergence of biofuels as well as financial speculation. We review the impacts of the first four real-side factors using a world trade computable general equilibrium model. Our simulation results show that oil and biofuels-related shocks were the major factors among these four in crop price hikes but that these real-side factors in total can explain only about 10% of the actual crop price rises.

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Paper provided by National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies in its series GRIPS Discussion Papers with number 11-16.

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Length: 32 pages
Date of creation: Dec 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ngi:dpaper:11-16
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  1. Du, Xiaodong & Yu, Cindy L. & Hayes, Dermot J., 2009. "Speculation and Volatility Spillover in the Crude Oil and Agricultural Commodity Markets: A Bayesian Analysis," 2009 Annual Meeting, July 26-28, 2009, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 49276, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  2. Taheripour, Farzad & Dileep Birur & Thomas Hertel & Wally Tyner, 2007. "Introducing Liquid Biofuels into the GTAP Data Base," GTAP Research Memoranda 2534, Center for Global Trade Analysis, Department of Agricultural Economics, Purdue University.
  3. Tanaka, Tetsuji & Hosoe, Nobuhiro, 2011. "Does agricultural trade liberalization increase risks of supply-side uncertainty?: Effects of productivity shocks and export restrictions on welfare and food supply in Japan," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 368-377, June.
  4. Brian D. Wright, 2011. "The Economics of Grain Price Volatility," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 33(1), pages 32-58.
  5. Headey, Derek & Fan, Shenggen, 2008. "Anatomy of a crisis: The causes and consequences of surging food prices," IFPRI discussion papers 831, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  6. Mitchell, Donald, 2008. "A note on rising food prices," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4682, The World Bank.
  7. Burniaux, Jean-Marc & Truong Truong, 2002. "GTAP-E: An Energy-Environmental Version of the GTAP Model," GTAP Technical Papers 923, Center for Global Trade Analysis, Department of Agricultural Economics, Purdue University.
  8. Jun Yang & Huanguang Qiu & Jikun Huang & Scott Rozelle, 2008. "Fighting global food price rises in the developing world: the response of China and its effect on domestic and world markets," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 39(s1), pages 453-464, November.
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