IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ngi/dpaper/11-05.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

China's High-tech Exports: Myth and Reality

Author

Listed:
  • Yuqing Xing

    (National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies)

Abstract

China's leading position in high-tech exports is a myth created by outdated trade statistics, which are inconsistent with the trade based on global supply chains. Assembled high-tech products, made with imported key parts and components, accounted for 82% of China's high-tech exports. Current trade statistics mistakenly credit entire values of these assembled products to China, thus greatly inflate the export value. For instance, in 2009 China's export in the iPhone amounted US$4.6 billion, of which only 3.6% was the value added by Chinese workers; its annual export in laptop PC valued at US$52 billion, but assembly accounted for only 3% of the gross value. In addition, 83% of China's high-tech exports was attributed to foreign invested firms, in particular Taiwanese owned companies. Taiwan-IT companies have relocated 95% of their production/assembly capacity into and transferred mainland China to a top assembler of information and communication technology, such as laptop PCs, digital cameras and all i-products.

Suggested Citation

  • Yuqing Xing, 2011. "China's High-tech Exports: Myth and Reality," GRIPS Discussion Papers 11-05, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:ngi:dpaper:11-05
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://grips.repo.nii.ac.jp/?action=repository_action_common_download&item_id=1062&item_no=1&attribute_id=20&file_no=1
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Xing Yuqing, 2016. "Global Value Chains and New Thinking on Trade and Industrial Policy," GRIPS Discussion Papers 16-07, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies.
    2. Kozo Kiyota & Keita Oikawa & Katsuhiro Yoshioka, 2017. "The Global Value Chain and the Competitiveness of Asian Countries," Asian Economic Papers, MIT Press, vol. 16(3), pages 257-281, Fall.
    3. repec:cup:netsci:v:6:y:2018:i:04:p:607-632_00 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Xing, Yuqing, 2014. "Measuring Value Added in the People’s Republic of China’s Exports: A Direct Approach," ADBI Working Papers 493, Asian Development Bank Institute.
    5. Chen, Xi & Funke, Michael, 2013. "The dynamics of catch-up and skill and technology upgrading in China," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 38(PB), pages 465-480.
    6. Mercedes Campi & Marco Due~nas & Le Li & Huabin Wu, 2018. "Diversification, economies of scope, and exports growth of Chinese firms," Papers 1801.02681, arXiv.org, revised Jan 2018.
    7. Yuqing Xing, 2016. "Global Value Chains and China's Exports to High-income Countries," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(2), pages 191-203, June.
    8. Xing, Yuqing, 2018. "Rising wages, yuan's appreciation and China's processing exports," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 114-122.
    9. John Whalley & Xiliang Zhao, 2010. "The Contribution of Human Capital to China's Economic Growth," NBER Working Papers 16592, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Zhu, Zhen & Morrison, Greg & Puliga, Michelangelo & Chessa, Alessandro & Riccaboni, Massimo, 2018. "The similarity of global value chains: A network-based measure," Network Science, Cambridge University Press, vol. 6(4), pages 607-632, December.
    11. Xing, Yuqing, 2012. "Processing trade, exchange rates and China's bilateral trade balances," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 540-547.
    12. repec:eee:chieco:v:49:y:2018:i:c:p:24-44 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Yuqing Xing, 2011. "China’s exports in information communication technology and its impact on Asian countries," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 44(1), pages 135-147, April.
    14. Xiao, Yangao & Tylecote, Andrew & Liu, Jiajia, 2013. "Why not greater catch-up by Chinese firms? The impact of IPR, corporate governance and technology intensity on late-comer strategies," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 749-764.
    15. Sawhney, Aparna & Kahn, Matthew E., 2012. "Understanding cross-national trends in high-tech renewable power equipment exports to the United States," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 308-318.
    16. repec:tpr:asiaec:v:17:y:2018:i:2:p:140-151 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    China; high-tech; value added; iPhone;

    JEL classification:

    • F10 - International Economics - - Trade - - - General
    • N75 - Economic History - - Economic History: Transport, International and Domestic Trade, Energy, and Other Services - - - Asia including Middle East

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ngi:dpaper:11-05. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/gripsjp.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.