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Mapping Accessibility Over Time

Author

Listed:
  • Ahmed El-Geneidy
  • David Levinson

    () (Nexus (Networks, Economics, and Urban Systems) Research Group, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Minnesota)

Abstract

The concept of "accessibility" has been coin in the transportation planning field for more than 40 years. Improving accessibility is a common element in the goals section in almost all transportation plans in the US. In this study we compare the changes in levels of accessibility over time in the Minneapolis - St. Paul region using two different modes (auto and transit). The importance of accessibility as a measure of land use and transportation planning performance in the region is revealed by comparing it over time. The longitudinal analysis being conducted shows improvements in most areas in the studied region in terms of the level of accessibility by automobile, and a drop in accessibility by transit over the period 1990 to 2000. The findings are compared to the levels of congestion in the region between the same time periods. This comparison shows the difference between the two measures and strengthens the importance of accessibility measures as a tool for monitoring and evaluating regional land use and transportation planning performance.

Suggested Citation

  • Ahmed El-Geneidy & David Levinson, 2007. "Mapping Accessibility Over Time," Working Papers 200709, University of Minnesota: Nexus Research Group.
  • Handle: RePEc:nex:wpaper:accessibilityovertime
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/11299/179955
    File Function: First version, 2007
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Paul Anderson & David Levinson & Pavithra Parthasarathi, 2011. "Accessibility Futures," Working Papers 000088, University of Minnesota: Nexus Research Group.
    2. Wachs, Martin & Kumagai, T. Gordon, 1973. "Physical accessibility as a social indicator," Socio-Economic Planning Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 7(5), pages 437-456, October.
    3. Handy, Susan, 1994. "Highway Blues: Nothing a Little Accessibility Can't Cure," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt66k8b8bz, University of California Transportation Center.
    4. David Levinson & Ajay Kumar, 1994. "The Rational Locator: Why Travel Times Have Remained Stable," Working Papers 199402, University of Minnesota: Nexus Research Group.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Kevin Manaugh & Ahmed El- Geneidy, 2012. "Who benefits from new transportation infrastructure? Using accessibility measures to evaluate social equity in public transport provision," Chapters,in: Accessibility Analysis and Transport Planning, chapter 12, pages 211-227 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Venter, Christoffel, 2016. "Assessing the potential of bus rapid transit-led network restructuring for enhancing affordable access to employment – The case of Johannesburg's Corridors of Freedom," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 441-449.
    3. Horner, Mark & Downs, Joni, 2014. "Integrating people and place: A density-based measure for assessing accessibility to opportunities," The Journal of Transport and Land Use, Center for Transportation Studies, University of Minnesota, vol. 7(2), pages 1-18.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • R40 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - General
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • R14 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Land Use Patterns

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