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Moore's Law and Learning-By-Doing

  • Boyan Jovanovic
  • Peter L. Rousseau

We model Moore's Law as efficiency of computer producers that rises as a by-product of their experience. We find that (1) Because computer prices fall much faster than the prices of electricity-driven and diesel-driven capital ever did, growth in the coming decades should be very fast, and that (2) The obsolescence of firms today occurs faster than before, partly because the physical capital they own becomes obsolete faster.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w8762.pdf
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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 8762.

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Date of creation: Jan 2002
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Publication status: published as Boyan Jovanovic & Peter L. Rousseau, 2002. "Moore's Law and Learning-By-Doing," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 5(2), pages 346-375, April.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:8762
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  17. Peter Klenow, 1998. "Learning Curves and the Cyclical Behavior of Manufacturing Industries," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 1(2), pages 531-550, April.
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