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Hong Kong's Business Regulation in Transition

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  • Changqi Wu
  • Leonard K. Cheng

Abstract

The transition of Hong Kong's main economic activities from manufacturing to services is accompanied by gradual changes in the regulatory regimes for monopolies. The local telecommunication services industry has been liberalized, deregulation of public transport is taking shape, and the schemes of control for electricity suppliers are candidates for reform. In this paper, we review the evolution of business regulation in Hong Kong, analyze the salient features of its scheme of control regulation and evaluate the impact of transition from regulation to competition. To provide a sharp contrast between the difficulties of the traditional approach to regulation and the benefits of introducing competition, we focus on the cases of electricity and telecommunications. The direction for future changes is also discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Changqi Wu & Leonard K. Cheng, 1997. "Hong Kong's Business Regulation in Transition," NBER Working Papers 6332, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:6332
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ho, Chun-Yu & Siu, Kam Wing, 2007. "A dynamic equilibrium of electricity consumption and GDP in Hong Kong: An empirical investigation," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 2507-2513, April.
    2. Woo, C.K. & Cheng, Y.S. & Law, A. & Zarnikau, J. & Ho, S.T. & Leung, H.Y., 2015. "Consumer support for a public utilities commission in Hong Kong," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 87-97.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • L43 - Industrial Organization - - Antitrust Issues and Policies - - - Legal Monopolies and Regulation or Deregulation
    • L51 - Industrial Organization - - Regulation and Industrial Policy - - - Economics of Regulation

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