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Top Executives, Turnover and Firm Performance in Germany

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  • Steven N. Kaplan

Abstract

This paper examines executive turnover -- both for management and supervisory boards - - and its relation to firm performance in the largest companies in Germany in the 1980s. The management board turns over slowly -- at a rate of 10% per year -- implying that top executives in Germany have longer tenures than their counterparts in the U.S. and Japan. Turnover of the management board increases significantly with stock performance and particularly poor (i.e. negative) earnings, but is unrelated to sales growth and earnings growth. Turnover of the supervisory board is not consistently related to any measure of performance.

Suggested Citation

  • Steven N. Kaplan, 1993. "Top Executives, Turnover and Firm Performance in Germany," NBER Working Papers 4416, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:4416
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    1. Takeo Hoshi & Anil Kashyap & David Scharfstein, 1991. "Corporate Structure, Liquidity, and Investment: Evidence from Japanese Industrial Groups," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(1), pages 33-60.
    2. Grundfest, Joseph A., 1990. "Subordination of American capital," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 89-114, September.
    3. Benjamin E. Hermalin & Michael S. Weisbach, 1988. "The Determinants of Board Composition," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 19(4), pages 589-606, Winter.
    4. Steven Kaplan & Bernadette Minton, 1993. "'Outside' Intervention in Japanese Companies: Its Determinants and Implications for Mangers," NBER Working Papers 4276, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Steven N. Kaplan, 1992. "Top Executive Rewards and Firm Performance: A Comparison of Japan and the U.S," NBER Working Papers 4065, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Stephen D. Prowse, 1990. "Institutional investment patterns and corporate financial behavior in the U.S. and Japan," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 108, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
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