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Japanese Foreign Direct Investment

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  • Kenneth A. Froot

Abstract

Japan's outflows of foreign direct investment (FDI) have increased dramatically in recent years, to the point where Japan has become the world's largest overseas direct investor. This paper documents the increase in Japanese FDI, as well as its breakdown across industries and countries. Investments in real estate and financial services have grown most rapidly, as has Japanese FDI into North America, which now accounts for fully half of Japan's outflows. The paper then goes on to discuss and evaluate some of the most popular explanations for this explosion in investment: Japanese current account surpluses; actual or anticipated protectionism abroad; appreciated stock prices and value of the yen; and changes in international tax policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Kenneth A. Froot, 1991. "Japanese Foreign Direct Investment," NBER Working Papers 3737, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:3737
    Note: ITI ME IFM
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kenneth A. Froot & Jeremy C. Stein, 1989. "Exchange Rates and Foreign Direct Investment: An Imperfect Capital Markets Approach," NBER Working Papers 2914, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. D.N. Saxena, 1989. "Foreign Direct Investment," Foreign Trade Review, , vol. 24(1), pages 76-97, April.
    3. Scholes, Myron S & Wolfson, Mark A, 1990. "The Effects of Changes in Tax Laws on Corporate Reorganization Activity," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 63(1), pages 141-164, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Razvan Hagima, 2013. "The Fdi Flows Between The Triad Members," CES Working Papers, Centre for European Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, vol. 5(4), pages 512-517, December.
    2. Anusha Chari & Paige P. Ouimet & Linda L. Tesar, 2004. "Enhancing the Benefits for India and Other Developing Countries in the Doha Development Agenda Negotiations," Working Papers 511, Research Seminar in International Economics, University of Michigan.
    3. Urata, Shujiro, 1998. "Explaining the poor performance of Japanese direct investment in the United States," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 49-62, January.
    4. Belderbos, Rene & Capannelli, Giovanni & Fukao, Kyoji, 2001. "Backward Vertical Linkages of Foreign Manufacturing Affiliates: Evidence from Japanese Multinationals," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 189-208, January.
    5. Roger Farrell, 2000. "Japanese Foreign Direct Investment in the World Economy 1951-1997," Asia Pacific Economic Papers 299, Australia-Japan Research Centre, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    6. Assaf Razin, 2002. "FDI Contribution to Capital Flows and Investment in Capacity," NBER Working Papers 9204, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Bayoumi, Tamim & Lipworth, Gabrielle, 1998. "Japanese foreign direct investment and regional trade," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 581-607.
    8. repec:jes:wpaper:y:2013:v:5:p:512-517 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Barrell, Ray & Pain, Nigel, 1999. "Trade restraints and Japanese direct investment flows," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 29-45, January.
    10. John Howe, 1994. "Internationalisation, Trade and Foreign Direct Investment," RBA Annual Conference Volume,in: Philip Lowe & Jacqueline Dwyer (ed.), International Intergration of the Australian Economy Reserve Bank of Australia.
    11. Kenneth A. Froot & David B. Yoffie, 1993. "Trading Blocs and the Incentives to Protect: Implications for Japan and East Asia," NBER Chapters,in: Regionalism and Rivalry: Japan and the United States in Pacific Asia, pages 125-156 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Farrell, Roger & Gaston, Noel & Sturm, Jan-Egbert, 2004. "Determinants of Japan's foreign direct investment: An industry and country panel study, 1984-1998," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 161-182, June.
    13. Anusha Chari & Paige P. Ouimet & Linda L. Tesar, 2004. "Acquiring Control in Emerging Markets: Evidence from the Stock Market," NBER Working Papers 10872, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Hackett, Steven C. & Srinivasan, Krishna, 1998. "Do supplier switching costs differ across Japanese and US multinational firms?," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 13-32, January.
    15. Peter Drysdale & Roger Farrell, 1999. "Perspectives on Japanese Investment, Employment and Management in Australia," Asia Pacific Economic Papers 290, Australia-Japan Research Centre, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

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