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Crime, Punishment and the Halo Effect of Corporate Social Responsibility

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  • Harrison Hong
  • Inessa Liskovich

Abstract

Three reasons are often cited for the value of corporate social responsibility: product quality signalling, delegated giving, and the halo effect. Previous tests cannot separate these channels because they focus on consumers, who value all three. We focus on prosecutors, who are only susceptible to the halo effect. Using Foreign Corrupt Practices Act enforcements, we find that social responsibility is associated with 2 million dollars less in fines, though it is uncorrelated with bribe characteristics and cooperation, which should entirely determine sanctions following Becker (1974). We show that this bias is likely a halo effect and not prosecutorial conflict of interest.

Suggested Citation

  • Harrison Hong & Inessa Liskovich, 2015. "Crime, Punishment and the Halo Effect of Corporate Social Responsibility," NBER Working Papers 21215, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:21215
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Arlen, Jennifer, 1994. "The Potentially Perverse Effects of Corporate Criminal Liability," The Journal of Legal Studies, University of Chicago Press, vol. 23(2), pages 832-867, June.
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    7. Henrik Cronqvist & Fredrik Heyman & Mattias Nilsson & Helena Svaleryd & Jonas Vlachos, 2009. "Do Entrenched Managers Pay Their Workers More?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 64(1), pages 309-339, February.
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    11. Ing-Haw Cheng & Harrison Hong & Kelly Shue, 2013. "Do Managers Do Good with Other People's Money?," NBER Working Papers 19432, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Lint Barrage & Eric Chyn & Justine Hastings, 2014. "Advertising as Insurance or Commitment? Evidence from the BP Oil Spill," NBER Working Papers 19838, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Andreoni, James, 1989. "Giving with Impure Altruism: Applications to Charity and Ricardian Equivalence," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(6), pages 1447-1458, December.
    14. Edmans, Alex, 2011. "Does the stock market fully value intangibles? Employee satisfaction and equity prices," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 101(3), pages 621-640, September.
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    16. Paul C. Tetlock, 2007. "Giving Content to Investor Sentiment: The Role of Media in the Stock Market," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 62(3), pages 1139-1168, June.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Andreas Hoepner & Lisa Schopohl, 2015. "Red versus Blue: Do Political Dimensions Influence the Investment Preferences of State Pension Funds?," ICMA Centre Discussion Papers in Finance icma-dp2015-06, Henley Business School, Reading University.
    2. Lins, Karl & Servaes, Henri & Tamayo, Ane, 2015. "Social Capital, Trust, and Firm Performance during the Financial Crisis," CEPR Discussion Papers 10399, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. repec:bla:jfinan:v:72:y:2017:i:4:p:1785-1824 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Muermann, Alexander & Rauter, Thomas, 2016. "Prestige and loan pricing," CFS Working Paper Series 544, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
    5. Barkó, Tamás & Cremers, M. & Renneboog, Luc, 2017. "Shareholder Engagement on Environmental, Social, and Governance Performance," Discussion Paper 2017-040, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    6. repec:eee:corfin:v:48:y:2018:i:c:p:700-725 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Karl V. Lins & Henri Servaes & Ane Tamayo, 2017. "Social Capital, Trust, and Firm Performance: The Value of Corporate Social Responsibility during the Financial Crisis," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 72(4), pages 1785-1824, August.
    8. Dhammika Dharmapala & Vikramaditya Khanna, 2016. "The Impact of Mandated Corporate Social Responsibility: Evidence from India's Companies Act of 2013," CESifo Working Paper Series 6200, CESifo Group Munich.

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    JEL classification:

    • G0 - Financial Economics - - General
    • K0 - Law and Economics - - General

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