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Crowding-Out Charitable Contributions in Canada: New Knowledge from the North


  • James Andreoni
  • A. Abigail Payne


Using data from charitable organizations in the US, authors have established that government grants to charities largely crowd out giving from other sources, but that this reduction is due mostly to reduced fundraising activities of the charity itself. We use much more detailed data from over 6000 charities in Canada, measured for up to 15 years, to provide valuable new insights into this phenomenon. In particular, dollars received from individuals is largely unchanged by government grants. Instead, the crowding out is attributable to two other sources of donations not differentiated in US data: giving from other charities and charitable foundations, and donations gained from special fundraising activities, like galas or sponsorships. Only the latter-which is about half of the measured crowding out-represents a potential loss of dollars to the charitable sector as a result of government grants.

Suggested Citation

  • James Andreoni & A. Abigail Payne, 2011. "Crowding-Out Charitable Contributions in Canada: New Knowledge from the North," NBER Working Papers 17635, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:17635
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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Andreoni,J. & Payne,A.A., 2001. "Government grants to private charities : do they crowd out giving or fundraising?," Working papers 19, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.
    2. Vesterlund, Lise, 2003. "The informational value of sequential fundraising," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(3-4), pages 627-657, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Andreoni, James & Payne, Abigail & Smith, Sarah, 2014. "Do grants to charities crowd out other income? Evidence from the UK," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 75-86.
    2. Paul Missios & Ida Ferrara, 2012. "Does Waste Management Policy Crowd out Social and Moral Motives for Recycling?," Working Papers 031, Ryerson University, Department of Economics.
    3. Yildirim, Huseyin, 2014. "Andreoni–McGuire algorithm and the limits of warm-glow giving," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 101-107.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D64 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Altruism; Philanthropy; Intergenerational Transfers
    • H44 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Publicly Provided Goods: Mixed Markets
    • H5 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies

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