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Skew-normal shocks in the linear state space form DSGE model

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Abstract

Observed macroeconomic data – notably GDP growth rate, inflation and interest rates – can be, and usually are skewed. Economists attempt to fit models to data by matching first and second moments or co-moments, but skewness is usually neglected. It is so probably because skewness cannot appear in linear (or linearized) models with Gaussian shocks, and shocks are usually assumed to be Gaussian. Skewness requires non-linearities or non-Gaussian shocks. In this paper we introduce skewness into the DSGE framework assuming skewed normal distribution for shocks while keeping the model linear (or linearized). We argue that such a skewness can be perceived as structural, since it concerns the nature of structural shocks. Importantly, the skewed normal distribution nests the normal one, so that skewness is not assumed, but only allowed for. We derive elementary facts about skewness propagation in the state space model and, using the well-known Lubik-Schorfheide model, we run simulations to investigate how skewness propagates from shocks to observables in a standard DSGE model. We also assess properties of an ad hoc two-steps estimator of models’ parameters, shocks’ skewness parameters among them.

Suggested Citation

  • Grzegorz Grabek & Bohdan Klos & Grzegorz Koloch, 2011. "Skew-normal shocks in the linear state space form DSGE model," NBP Working Papers 101, Narodowy Bank Polski, Economic Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbp:nbpmis:101
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    File URL: http://www.nbp.pl/publikacje/materialy_i_studia/101_en.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kim, Jinill & Ruge-Murcia, Francisco J., 2009. "How much inflation is necessary to grease the wheels?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(3), pages 365-377, April.
    2. Lubik, Thomas A. & Schorfheide, Frank, 2007. "Do central banks respond to exchange rate movements? A structural investigation," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(4), pages 1069-1087, May.
    3. Gupta, Arjun K. & González-Farías, Graciela & Domínguez-Molina, J. Armando, 2004. "A multivariate skew normal distribution," Journal of Multivariate Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 89(1), pages 181-190, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Cabral, Celso Rômulo Barbosa & da-Silva, Cibele Queiroz & Migon, Helio S., 2014. "A dynamic linear model with extended skew-normal for the initial distribution of the state parameter," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 64-80.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C12 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Hypothesis Testing: General
    • C13 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Estimation: General
    • C16 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Econometric and Statistical Methods; Specific Distributions
    • D58 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Computable and Other Applied General Equilibrium Models
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles

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