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Earnings Growth versus Measures of Income and Education for Predicting Mortality

Author

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  • Harriet Orcutt Duleep

    (Research Professor of Public Policy, Thomas Jefferson Program in Public Policy, The College of William & Mary)

  • David Jaeger

    (Professor of Economics, The Graduate Center, City University of New York)

Abstract

This paper begins an exploration to determine whether earnings growth, as a measure of the propensity to invest in human capital, is a valuable variable for predicting mortality. To insure its robustness and general applicability to ongoing Social Security models, the usefulness of earnings growth as a predictor of mortality will be explored in multiple time periods. This paper begins that process by reporting preliminary results for an early time period using the 1973 CPS-SSA-IRS Exact Match file. In addition to presenting preliminary results, the paper also describes how data challenges associated with the pre-1978 administrative record data on earnings and mortality are met.

Suggested Citation

  • Harriet Orcutt Duleep & David Jaeger, 2011. "Earnings Growth versus Measures of Income and Education for Predicting Mortality," Working Papers wp257, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
  • Handle: RePEc:mrr:papers:wp257
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Fuchs, Victor R. (ed.), 1982. "Economic Aspects of Health," National Bureau of Economic Research Books, University of Chicago Press, number 9780226267852, December.
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