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Financial Market Reaction to Federal Reserve Communications: Does the Crisis Make a Difference?

Author

Listed:
  • Bernd Hayo

    () (Philipps-University Marburg)

  • Ali M. Kutan

    (Southern Illinois University Edwardsville)

  • Matthias Neuenkirch

    () (Philipps-University Marburg)

Abstract

This paper studies the effects of Federal Reserve communications on US financial market returns from 1998 to 2009 and asks whether a significant change occurred during the financial crisis of August 2007–December 2009. We find, first, that central bank communication moves financial markets in the intended direction. In particular, shorter maturities are affected in an economically meaningful way. Second, speeches by the Chairman generate relatively more public attention than communication by other governors or presidents. Finally, central bank communication is even more market relevant during the financial crisis subsample.

Suggested Citation

  • Bernd Hayo & Ali M. Kutan & Matthias Neuenkirch, 2008. "Financial Market Reaction to Federal Reserve Communications: Does the Crisis Make a Difference?," MAGKS Papers on Economics 200808, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
  • Handle: RePEc:mar:magkse:200808
    as

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    File URL: http://www.uni-marburg.de/fb02/makro/forschung/magkspapers/08-2008_hayo.pdf
    File Function: Sixth version, 2011
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Hayo, Bernd & Neuenkirch, Matthias, 2013. "Do Federal Reserve presidents communicate with a regional bias?," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 62-72.
    2. Bernd Hayo & Ali M. Kutan & Matthias Neuenkirch, 2012. "Federal Reserve Communications and Emerging Equity Markets," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 78(3), pages 1041-1056, January.
    3. Matthias Neuenkirch, 2014. "Federal Reserve communications and newswire coverage," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(25), pages 3119-3129, September.
    4. Melanie-Kristin Beck & Bernd Hayo & Matthias Neuenkirch, 2013. "Central bank communication and correlation between financial markets: Canada and the United States," International Economics and Economic Policy, Springer, vol. 10(2), pages 277-296, June.
    5. Hayo, Bernd & Neuenkirch, Matthias, 2012. "Bank of Canada communication, media coverage, and financial market reactions," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 115(3), pages 369-372.
    6. Hayo, Bernd & Kutan, Ali M. & Neuenkirch, Matthias, 2012. "Communication matters: US monetary policy and commodity price volatility," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 117(1), pages 247-249.
    7. Hayo, Bernd & Neuenkirch, Matthias, 2010. "Do Federal Reserve communications help predict federal funds target rate decisions?," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 1014-1024, December.
    8. Fender, Ingo & Hayo, Bernd & Neuenkirch, Matthias, 2012. "Daily pricing of emerging market sovereign CDS before and during the global financial crisis," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(10), pages 2786-2794.
    9. Rosa, Carlo, 2014. "The high-frequency response of energy prices to U.S. monetary policy: Understanding the empirical evidence," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 295-303.
    10. Dick van Dijk & Robin L. Lumsdaine & Michel van der Wel, 2014. "Market Set-Up in Advance of Federal Reserve Policy Decisions," NBER Working Papers 19814, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Central Bank Communication; Federal Reserve; Financial Crisis; Financial Markets; Monetary Policy;

    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading

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