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Urbanization and its Effects on the Happiness Domains

Author

Listed:
  • Cristina Bernini

    () (University of Bologna)

  • Alessandro Tampieri

    () (University of Bologna and CREA, Université du Luxembourg)

Abstract

We analyze the effects of urbanization on the specific components of the happiness function. We exploit the dataset HADL on Italian citizens over the period 2010-2013. A multilevel approach is used to take into account of regional heterogeneity in the happiness’s determinants. We find that, in line with much of the literature, urbanization is negatively related to subjective well-being. However, the impact of urbanization changes depending on the specific happiness spheres: while satisfaction with economic conditions is not affected by urbanization, job and family satisfaction increase with urbanization. Conversely, satisfaction with health, friendship, spare time and environment decrease with urbanization.

Suggested Citation

  • Cristina Bernini & Alessandro Tampieri, 2017. "Urbanization and its Effects on the Happiness Domains," CREA Discussion Paper Series 17-10, Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg.
  • Handle: RePEc:luc:wpaper:17-10
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Urbanization and its Effects on the Happiness Domains
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2017-09-28 19:47:57

    More about this item

    Keywords

    subjective well-being; happiness function; urbanization; regions; multilevel models;

    JEL classification:

    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • R10 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - General

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