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Managing Global Financial Flows at the Cost of National Autonomy: China and India

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  • Sunanda Sen

Abstract

The narrative as well as the analysis of global imbalances in the existing literature are incomplete without the part of the story that relates to the surge in capital flows experienced by the emerging economies. Such analysis disregards the implications of capital flows on their domestic economies, especially in terms of the "impossibility" of following a monetary policy that benefits domestic growth. It also fails to recognize the significance of uncertainty and changes in expectation as factors in the (precautionary) buildup of large official reserves. The consequences are many, and affect the fabric of growth and distribution in these economies. The recent experiences of China and India, with their deregulated financial sectors, bear this out. Financial integration and free capital mobility, which are supposed to generate growth with stability (according to the "efficient markets" hypothesis), have not only failed to achieve their promises (especially in the advanced economies) but also forced the high-growth developing economies like India and China into a state of compliance, where domestic goals of stability and development are sacrificed in order to attain the globally sanctioned norm of free capital flows. With the global financial crisis and the specter of recession haunting most advanced economies, the high-growth economies in Asia have drawn much less attention than they deserve. This oversight leaves the analysis incomplete, not only by missing an important link in the prevailing network of global trade and finance, but also by ignoring the structural changes in these developing economies--many of which are related to the pattern of financialization and turbulence in the advanced economies.

Suggested Citation

  • Sunanda Sen, 2012. "Managing Global Financial Flows at the Cost of National Autonomy: China and India," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_714, Levy Economics Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:lev:wrkpap:wp_714
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    File URL: http://www.levyinstitute.org/pubs/wp_714.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Thomas I. Palley, 2009. "Rethinking the Economics of Capital Mobility and Capital Controls," Working Papers wp193, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    2. Ila Patnaik & Ajay Shah, 2012. "Asia Confronts the Impossible Trinity," Chapters,in: Monetary and Currency Policy Management in Asia, chapter 7 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Reade, J. James & Volz, Ulrich, 2010. "Chinese monetary policy and the dollar peg," Discussion Papers 2010/35, Free University Berlin, School of Business & Economics.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Global Current Account Imbalances; Impossible Trinity; Capital Mobility; Official Reserves; Monetary Policy; National Autonomy; Efficient Market;

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • F42 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - International Policy Coordination and Transmission
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance
    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East

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