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The Anatomy of Changing Male Earnings Inequality: An Empirical Exploration of Determinants

  • Robert Haveman
  • Lawrence Buron

The source of the increased inequality in the distribution of male earnings has been the focus of much economic analysis. In this working paper, Robert H. Haveman and Lawrence Buron attempt to find the source of the increased inequality in the distribution of male earnings since the 1970s. Specifically, they seek to find: (1) the relative contributions of changes in wage rates and hours worked to the observed increase in male earnings inequality; (2) whether the relative contributions of changes in relative wage rates and work times to earnings inequality alters if the population examined is all males versus all male workers; (3) the changes over time in wage rate and work time variability within the standard categories of male work patterns; and (4) what the effect of changes in the structure of male work patterns—for example, FTYR work versus part–time or part–year work—has been on the pattern of earnings inequality.

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Paper provided by Levy Economics Institute in its series Economics Working Paper Archive with number wp_104.

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Date of creation: Feb 1994
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Handle: RePEc:lev:wrkpap:wp_104
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.levyinstitute.org

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  1. Yitzhaki, Shlomo & Lerman, Robert I, 1991. "Income Stratification and Income Inequality," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 37(3), pages 313-29, September.
  2. Juhn, Chinhui, 1992. "Decline of Male Labor Market Participation: The Role of Declining Market Opportunities," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 107(1), pages 79-121, February.
  3. Levy, Frank & Murnane, Richard J, 1992. "U.S. Earnings Levels and Earnings Inequality: A Review of Recent Trends and Proposed Explanations," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 30(3), pages 1333-81, September.
  4. Juhn, Chinhui & Murphy, Kevin M & Pierce, Brooks, 1993. "Wage Inequality and the Rise in Returns to Skill," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(3), pages 410-42, June.
  5. John Bound & Charles Brown & Greg J. Duncan & Willard L Rodgers, 1989. "Measurement Error In Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Labor Market Surveys: Results From Two Validation Studies," NBER Working Papers 2884, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Lerman, Robert I. & Yitzhaki, Shlomo, 1989. "Improving the accuracy of estimates of Gini coefficients," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 43-47, September.
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